The Importance Of Technology In Jurassic Park

1906 Words 8 Pages
In the genre of science fiction, authors and directors create new worlds of fantastic possibilities. Some of these worlds take place in our future, theorizing about things that are to come, while others take us to galaxies far, far away. Regardless of where or when the story takes place, particular conventions are always certain. One such convention is that when a new technology is central to the plot, the technology will cause harm. Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan demonstrates this through the building of the Genesis project, Jurassic Park through the revival of dinosaurs, and I, Robot through the creation of robots and the “three laws”. These three films demonstrate how new technologies turn from helpful, new phenomena, to something that …show more content…
John Hammond, a rich philanthropist, funds a project to find dinosaur DNA. Once his workers discover the DNA, they use it to recreate dinosaurs. John Hammond intends to create an amusement park where people can experience living dinosaurs. Although he is certain that the dinosaurs are completely under his control, they escape while Dennis, an employee, attempts to steal some of their DNA. By doing so, he turns off the power of the park, effectively letting the dinosaurs run amok. Hammond continues to believe that the dinosaurs escaping is just a speed bump, saying “All major theme parks have delays!” (Jurassic Park). However, by the end of the movie he comes to realize that he created a technology that could not be controlled, and abandons the island for good. This demonstrates that a technology can be extremely dangerous when the consequences are underestimated, ultimately causing destruction. The film, I, Robot, takes place in the near future, but in a world much different than our own. Within this world, robots are appliances that are used to help humans with everyday jobs. For example, in the first scene a robot is seen delivering mail, and another runs to a woman’s apartment to get her inhaler (Alex Proyas, I, Robot). Robots have been completely assimilated into society, causing humans to overly rely on them. Robots have been completely accepted due to the three …show more content…
In Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, the discussion surrounding Genesis is very philosophical and aware of the danger the technology could pose. Several of the characters discuss the possible ramifications of Genesis throughout the film. The first character to discuss the dangers of Genesis is Dr. David Marcus, one of the head scientists on the project. While he is speaking to his mother, Dr. Carol Marcus, he remarks, “We’ve built something that can be perverted into a terrible weapon,” (David Marcus, Wrath of Khan). Although he believes that this weapon can be used for evil, he continues to create it. This implies that he believes Genesis can be kept out of the wrong hands, even though people will try to bastardize its purpose. When this conversation takes place, the audience does not yet know what Genesis does. Once Captain Kirk discloses the nature of Genesis to Dr. McCoy and Spock, they all begin discussing the morality of such a weapon. McCoy questions the morality, stating, “Dear Lord. You think we 're intelligent enough to... suppose... what if this thing were used where life already exists?” (Leonard McCoy, Wrath of Khan). Spock reveals that all life on said planet would be destroyed, and used in the new matrix. McCoy begins to liken this machine to having the power of God, seeing it as a terrible thing, saying that they are “...talking about

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