Piaget's Play Analysis

Good Essays
The act of playing has a huge influence on children. Children learn and practice various social skills through playing with one another. Play allows them to develop a sense of self, teaches them how to interact with others their age, how to establish relationships such as friendships, and allows them to role-play. Play is the essential medium through which children develop knowledge, skills, and competence (stages of play). Mildred Parten, an early twentieth century play theorist, spent her time observing and identifying participation with others as a four step process in children’s play This process begins with nonsocial activity (unoccupied, onlooker behavior, solitary play), moves to parallel play (playing near other children by not partaking …show more content…
He believed that children gain knowledge about the world surrounding them through actions and explorations. According to Piaget, children are constantly assimilating new information during the course of their playful experiences. It is through this action of assimilation that intellectual growth occurs. This growth begins at birth and continues through adulthood. He presented to the world what he thought to be the 4 distinct stages of intellectual growth. The play activities of children differed depending on the stage of development the child was part of. These stages include sensorimotor, preoperational, concrete operational, and formal …show more content…
This stage takes place between the age range of two to seven years. Children now have a better ability to hold and recall the image of objects and events due to an increasing use of symbolization. Images allow children to represent objects and relationships in the world around them. Children begin to engage in what is known as “pretend” play during this time. For example, a child might see a playground and refer to it as their castle. They may take place in onlooker, parallel, associative, or cooperative play during this time. As a children progresses to the third stage of development, concrete operational, they are able to perform certain mental operations that they were previously incapable of. In this stage they have developed a concept of conservation, noting that certain properties of liquids and solids remain constant despite transformation in length, shape or grouping (Thompson 70). For instance, children from ages seven to twelve are able to determine that if a cup of juice is poured into a taller and smaller glass the amount of juice in the cup did not increase, it still has the same volume despite its outward

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    DeBord (2004) stated that play is a child 's work and learning how to play is essential. Toys, games, and activities enhance the evolving cognitive processes and information processing during their development stages. Parents must use the appropriate toys, games, activities, for babies, toddlers, and adolescents during their development stages. A parent knows why a toy makes sense at that particular age groups and gradually introduce them to toys for an older age group. In this way, they can be familiarized with the toys purpose.…

    • 1198 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Toy Play Analysis

    • 1529 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Using toys to play holds a critical role in the intellectual and social development of children. Children often use their daily playtime as a way to engage in the world around them. This play also helps them to have a better understanding of their surroundings. The most recent definition of play consists of five different criteria according to Pellegrini and Boyd (as cited in Toy Play in Infancy and Early Childhood: Normal Development and Special Considerations for Children with Disabilities, 1994). These criteria consist of attention to means, intrinsic motivation, nonliterality, active engagement, and freedom from external rules (Toy Play in Infancy and Early Childhood: Normal Development and Special Considerations for Children with Disabilities,…

    • 1529 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The schemata is a mental representations or concepts. As children receive new information they are constantly creating, modifying, organizing, and reorganizing schemata. So as the children are learning new things they are putting it with the information they already know. The second term is adaptation. Adaptation is the term piaget used for children mentally organizing what they perceive in their environment.…

    • 1016 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Jean Piaget created a theory of cognitive development, with stages relating to the age of a child for those ages. For children up to two years Piaget said they were in the Sensorimotor stage of development, where infants acquire knowledge through motor actions that are guided by sensory organs, and their environment (Cole, Lightfoot, Cole 178). When the child is provided with this toy they are able to explore the surroundings it provides with it’s many opportunities to learn. During this stage infants are acting upon the world that surrounds them, which helps them to grow as they influence each other. The environment they are in influences what they are doing, and how they are perceiving it (Cole, Lightfoot, Cole 178).…

    • 1534 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Also, around this age children should begin to sort objects by shapes and colors. Make-believe play is also a form of cognitive development. It is an example of children putting together what they understand of the world and acting it out for themselves. During their play a toddler “might call anything with four…

    • 761 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Active Learning

    • 1130 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Schemas are repetitive and children learn more when they are actively involved in play experiences, with a more hands on approach to learning. Jean Piaget (1896-1980) was one of the first cognitive psychologists who was interested in how cognitive structures are created and how they are linked to observed behaviors. More recently theorists Worthington and Carruthers (2003) have carried out work relating to schemas. They observed children aged four to six within a class setting and schemas were commonly detected, including enveloping, enclosing, transporting, connecting, rotating, connecting, spirals, trajectories and transformation. They found that there were patterns in the child’s schemas, with the youngest of children’s schemas bases upon their knowledge and ideas.…

    • 1130 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Child Toys

    • 842 Words
    • 4 Pages

    It allows them to use their imagination. At the same time, it is also helping with their social skills. For children in Stage 3 of Erikson's Psychosocial Stages, Initiative vs. Guilt, play is crucial because it allows children to explore their interpersonal skills by initiating activities. Having children play with Play-Doh in small groups of children or adults, allow for them to play collaboratively, have discussions, problem solve, and plan with others.…

    • 842 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    After a child moves past this level, onlooker behavior will begin. This level has the child observing how games are played. The child may ask questions and talk to the other children. This level leads children to learning by teaching children to ask questions and understand topics before becoming fully involved. For example, this level can teach a child to better ask questions during lessons when they are confused.…

    • 1039 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In addition to this Piaget (1986) also had a theory on children 's play. Piaget(1986) put forward a theory that children would go through 3 stages which were practice play, symbolic play and games with rules. Each of these stages helped strengthen children 's knowledge and it is through play that they were able to gain a understanding of their world. Piaget 's ideas are widely known and are currently being used in pre-school settings as a tool on helping children to learn (Paiget cited in Tassoni, 2007). In addition to this Froebel (1782) also shared a similar view to Piaget he believed that children will need to have experience with working and playing with different materials, equipment and activities so that…

    • 1283 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Socio-Dramatic Play

    • 1583 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Children take roles using characters like dolls, figures, and puppets as they interact. A practitioner may assist ideas for characters, settings or props and use the children's ideas for a story. Typically occurs between 3 - 4 years of age. As a child matures, themes, sequences, plans, problem solving, and characters become richer and they begin to organise other children for role play. Dramatic play is a form of symbolic play where a child pretends , imitating actions and speech from earlier situations.…

    • 1583 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays