What Is Corrective Feedback?

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The classroom is not a natural environment, and language learning in a Second Language Acquisition (SLA) class differs from language acquisition in the native speaker’s environment when a person lives as one of them. One of the features of language as learnt in a classroom is the teacher’s feedback, whose role in the modern theory of SLA is still much debated (Lochtman, 2002). Thus, the Universal Grammar approach in its strict form rejects any type of corrective feedback. Interactional-cognitive theories, on the other hand, see it as helpful when the learners recognize it as corrective upon they have produced some errors. Similarly, corrective feedback is seen as a potential contributor to improvement by sociocultural theory, which claims that …show more content…
76) says. The scholar’s opinion is that whereas “positive emotion feedback” has the power of encouraging learners to try again, the “negative cognition feedback” shows that the student has to make some adjustments (p. 77). Noels develops the argument about the negative and positive feedback and says that whereas the former is critical and, therefore, poses the threat of undermining the student’s intrinsic motivation, the latter is perceived as compassionate and one that only aims at showing the student how to improve his or her competence, which subsequently results in enhancing the intrinsic motivation (2010, p. 113). Such a claim was supported by a small-scale experimental study, conducted by Noel and colleagues, where a group of English students were learning French (1999, as quoted in Noel, 2010). In dealing with the issue of feedback, teachers might ask themselves many questions regarding whether it is necessary to correct a mistake, if so – when to do it (after the learner has finished talking or immediately by interrupting him or her), whether all errors should be corrected or only some of them, and how they should be corrected (Ellis, 2010, p. 10). As to the issue whether an error should be corrected and how it is to be done, Ur (1996) claims that feedback or error correction should always be positive because it promotes the positive self-image of a language learner whereas a negative feedback would only act as a punishment and discourage the person from pursuing the learning course (quoted in Ellis, 2010, p.

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