Pros And Cons Of Inclusion In Public Education

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Inclusion In Public Education: A necessity or self-damaging

Inclusion in public education, in other words, the combining of special needs individuals with regular students in the everyday life classrooms. Specials needs individuals are students in which have been labeled to have LD (Learning Disabilities). Learning disability means that a student has a hard time being able to participate in the act of learning like other children. The child has developmental problems that interfere with everyday activities. While other children are able to participate in the learning cycle accordingly without any interference. Children who are considered to have special needs are usually separated from students who are not. Inclusion in education will get rid of the boundaries in present day life allowing both students of special needs are non-LD to learn in the same room. This paper will discuss the history of special education, the needs of the child, the struggles and the several points of view. Before introducing the history of special education, we must first understand what is LD. In the 21st century there are several different learning disabilities and even then there are different levels of
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One main con is that there are many teachers who are inadequate to teach a student with special needs. Many have never come into contact with a student with needs, therefore, there will be a major disruption. Without knowing how to handle a special needs child, the child will not be able to learn appropriately, and more so the child could develop negative behaviors and having a teacher with no prior knowledge to decrease the behavior will make the situations worse. Another reason would be that with having a special needs child the pace of the class will not be in sync, The teacher will more than likely be focusing on the child more than the other students. Which leaves everyone at a

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