The Importance Of Inclusion In Education

1399 Words 6 Pages
Education’s two founding principles are that there will be education provided to all students that is “free and appropriate” and in “the least restrictive environment. In the past few years, a new movement has begun- full inclusion. The proponents of full inclusion have come from many backgrounds, but they all believe that self-containment classrooms are not the least restrictive environment for students with special needs. There are others who strongly argue against full inclusion with the primary claim that is not beneficial to any of the students or teachers involved. My views align fully with neither. As inclusion can be greatly beneficial, but it is not made for all students, I focus on the idea of partial inclusion. Full inclusion is …show more content…
Partial inclusion allows for students to be regular classrooms and self-containment classrooms to ensure for each subject they can receive the highest level of success. Partial inclusion would also allow for special needs students to still participate in school activities that are appropriate for them. There are private institutions and special needs schools where a special needs student may be in entirely self-contained classrooms and limited in school activities. Currently, most schools function on a partial inclusion system; however, some experts believe that schools are on their way to a “Zero Reject” systems, meaning full …show more content…
A great portion of students enrolled in special needs programs are there because they need more individualized attention. To place a student who needs more attention into a regular classroom would be not fair not only to the special needs child, who may not get what he needs, but to the other students in the classroom who may be ready to continue forward at a greater pace. Parents, educators, and students fought for specialized attention in public schools to ensure special needs were being met. Does full inclusion undo all of their work? While special needs supporters have always pushed for a community within the public school, full inclusion may not be the best option for it. If the average classroom is 50 minutes long with 25 students, and instructional time is 25 minutes, each child is left with one minutes of individual interaction. Many of the students will not need individual interaction; but if a special needs child was placed within the class, they would need more individual instruction in some capacity, greatly reducing the amount of time the teacher has for all students. If a s special needs students feels that they are component and independent enough for a regular classroom, then they should be given the chance to prove that, but not all special needs children feel this way about every subject. During my field placement in the fall of

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