The History And Importance Of The Non-Commissioned Officer

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The History and Importance of the Army’s Non Commissioned Officer. It is no small wonder for the Non-Commissioned Officer to be known as the backbone of the United States Army, a phrase coined by Rudyard Kipling. As we know the Non-Commissioned Army in todays military is but a mere remnant of what the NCO original was. The Non-Commissioned Officer existed during the European Hundred Years’ War, who at the time, were almost all upper ranks of European society, surprisingly. At the time, though, there was almost no interaction between soldiers and officers, so the Non-Commissioned Officer served as the link between the two, but to also maintain discipline in a garrison setting. Amazingly enough, the American Non-Commissioned Officer has been used since the first colonies in America, like Jamestown. An entire colony or town formed a much larger unit or company, …show more content…
The NCO was not only flexible in its ways to adapt to an ever changing enemy, culture, and terrain but also strictly about the training and development of the unit. The importance of a well-developed military played the leading role in allowing America to develop into the nation we have today. We could almost assume that with the rich history of the NCO, that this could all be credited towards the outstanding leadership that an NCO provided for his soldiers. Also worth noting, is the fact that the NCO was originally just a liaison for European soldiers that were farmers to the Noble Officers in which they had served for, but evolved into what we have today, the non-commissioned officer, able to get any task done, always places the mission first, and always cares for his or hers soldiers. The importance of the Non-Commissioned Officer is obviously an integral part of the Unite States of America’s military, the NCO, the backbone of the

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