4 Types Of Co-Teaching Essay

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“Co-teaching is defined as ‘two or more professionals delivering substantive instruction to a diverse, or blended group of students in a single physical space’ (Cook and Friend, 1995, p. 2) and thus comprises four basic characteristics” (Tremblay, 2013, p. 251). These four characteristics are two licensed, qualified instructors, most often a general education instructor and a special education instructor; a heterogeneous collection of students, meaning both general education and students with special needs; instruction being done by both instructors; and a shared setting, or a classroom. While this collaboration can consist of permanent, yearlong co-teaching, it can also be temporary, such as a few hours a day or a week (Tremblay, 2013, p. …show more content…
Support teaching, also known as “one teach, one assist” and the most commonly used, is a structure composed of one teacher who teaches the lesson and the second teacher observing or assisting with the the special education teacher performing the latter role. The four remaining types of co-teaching are parallel teaching, where the teachers are both teaching at the same time but not together; station teaching, where the students travel to different stations in the room two of which are led by the teachers; alternative teaching, which is where the general education instructor instructs the majority of the class while the special education teacher works in small groups with students; and team teaching, where the teachers are teaching the lesson together (Shaffer & Thomas-Brown, 2015, p. …show more content…
406). They found similar results for students in the same classrooms who had disabilities and were from low socioeconomic backgrounds, but no such outperformance from English Language Learners (Hedin & Conderman, 2015, p. 406).
Benefits of Co-teaching vs. Solo-teaching of Students with Learning Disabilities Philippe Tremblay (2013) and his team compared the effects of co-teaching and solo-teaching students with learning disabilities on the students’ academic achievement and attendance. The study followed a control group composed of 13 special education classes and an experimental group of 12 inclusion, or co-taught, classes. They retrieved their results from the academic tests of 353 students, 195 of which did not have disabilities, 58 of which had learning disabilities and were in an inclusion classroom, and 100 of which had learning disabilities and were in special education classrooms (Tremblay, 2013, p. 251). After following the academic progress of their subjects from October to June, Tremblay found that there was significant difference between the students with learning disabilities in inclusion settings and those in special education

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