The Core Concept Of Rational Emotive Behavior Group Counseling Theory

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Theory The theoretical orientation that I have begun to align with is Rational Emotive Behavior Group Counseling Theory (REBT). Albert Ellis created this theory in 1955. This theory revolves around the core concept of rational and irrational beliefs. A rational beliefs are consistent with reality, logical, enhances both the self and relationships. On the other hand, irrational beliefs are seen to be a psychological disturbance (Dryden, 2005). An irrational thought is illogical, defeating and inconstant with reality. This theory suggests that there are four types of both irrational and rational beliefs. The theory suggests that there is an ABC method to understanding the beliefs. A represents the activating event. B represents the belief whether …show more content…
This would in turn become an irrational belief. These ridged demands are ‘musts’ and ‘shoulds.’ If an individual believes that he or she must get a perfect school or else they are worth nothing. This would be an example of an irrational belief. Therefore, this suggests that the event is not irrational, but the view a person takes on the event. Unlike other behavioral approaches, REBT recognizes that empathy, unconditional positive regard, and genuineness are helpful to use in therapy, but are not necessary for change (Dryden, 2005). The goals of the theory in groups are to help the members of the group change their dysfunctional or irrational thoughts and behaviors. In doing so, help the members live a richer more satisfying life and help the members understand their responsibility for their own emotional reactions. It is the leaders role and responsibility to help the members understand that their thoughts are creating their own misery. In addition, the leader wants to dispute the member’s irrational thoughts and help the clients modify their thinking. Leaders running REBT groups will use techniques such as, cognitive homework, role playing, social skills training, contracting, the ABC theory, and other action oriented …show more content…
For example, in one session we were making a list of things that are in the student’s control and things that are not. All of the group members felt that their anger was not in their control; therefore, they believed that they must not get in trouble or linked to the aggressive act because they were perfect and the anger was not in their control. In this situation, the activating event would be someone else doing something to bother them. The belief would be I am going to get so angry right now because there is nothing I can do to stop it. The consequence would be that the student would do something mean or aggressive towards the instigator and then be reprimanded for their actions. Next, I stepped in and disputed the belief. I tried to explain that anger was inside of us and that it was not the events fault that you go tin trouble because ultimately each person has control over his or her own anger. I also expressed that maybe the rational belief may be that your anger is difficult to control, but it is not impossible. For there, we went into brainstorming rational ways to help calm down the groups anger. If the members in this group would have continued to believe that they were not at fault for conflicts because they could not control their anger this may have lead to psychological turmoil. The students may fully not believe the rational thoughts and due to the short

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