Met Architecture Analysis

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art, or the Met, is the most famous museum in New York City, and the largest museum in North America. The Met also owns a museum in far Upper Manhattan called “The Cloisters”, which predominantly showcases various forms of art from the medieval period. Although, I will be talking about the main Met compound located at 1000 Fifth Avenue. The Met’s permanent collection is comprised of art from an expansive range of culture and various time periods within said cultures. Some of these genres include Greek, Roman, Egyptian, European, Medieval, Modern, American, Native American, Asian, African, Middle Eastern, and Pacific Islander. These collections showcase art, history, and artifacts of the given genre. In addition to …show more content…
The size and beauty of its architecture are truly a sight to behold. This is especially so at night, in my opinion. The Met’s primary façade is on 82nd Street and 5th Avenue, and is a large tourist attraction on its own. It is one of New York’s primary architectural triumphs. The façade is constructed entirely of limestone. Tremendous columns surround arches at the top of a set of beautifully crafted stairs. Although constructed in 1902, the facade we see today has its roots in classical era architectural style; which is comprised of Greek and Roman elements of architecture developed during the classical era. The Met’s façade is mainly reminiscent of classical Roman architecture during the Renaissance, which is inspired by classical style. The Renaissance brought classical culture back into significance, as Gothic style had lost its appeal. Architects of the Renaissance took key architectural concepts from the ancient Roman world and utilized them. In some cases, they couldn’t figure out how to duplicate what had been constructed in the original city of Rome. The most predominant elements of Renaissance architecture used on the Metropolitan Museum of Art are extremely clear. The façade is symmetrical, utilizes columns of classical order, arches, windows within arches, statues, and many ornamental details. There are even domes, vaulted ceilings, and arches within the Great Hall, just behind the main …show more content…
This marks entrance to the European painting galleries. This collection is comprised of European Old Master paintings that date from the thirteenth to nineteenth centuries. This time span covers the years leading up to the Renaissance, the cultural revolution itself, and what happens afterwards. The painting “Triumph of Marius” being at the very top of the staircase might be symbolic of how this collection is the “Triumph” or pinnacle of great art. The collection is at the top of the staircase for the same symbolic reason, it is more refined, or “above” the other art downstairs. The painters are referred to as “Masters”, and subsequently the paintings are all “Masterpieces”. Also, a large portion of the art on the two wings of the ground floor is from times leading up to the period from which these pieces of art were created. Naturally, it makes more sense to see the earlier art first. Then you may ascend into high, refined art via the grand staircase. Although the aforementioned collections of art are rather easy to find, some are not. For instance, it is hard to find The Costume Institute, and even if you were to find it, it’s not normally open for public viewing. I also found Modern and Contemporary Art, Art of the Arab Lands, and Asian Art harder to find. This is because they are either tucked away in corners, or there are very specific,

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