An Essay On The Book 'The Allegory Of Sophie's World'

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Sophie’s World Essay

They are connected through history and Sophie's self awareness. The more she learns the more aware she comes. Just like the Allegory of the cave she was in the dark and then we see her escape and her finding the truth.
Sophie’s World is a novel about philosophy and its history. It follows the story of Sophie Amundsen, Sophie is just a little girl who begins to receive letters from a mysterious man. Then she starts to be consumed by philosophy. Then she finds a mirror and and meets the man that has been sending her letters. When she travels she realizes she is a character in book. Then she learns how different philosophers believed things and how science helped prove that evolution is real that disproves a huge part of christian faith. Also why we focus of the past so much it's so we don't make similar mistakes.
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Sophie is questioned about fate. Sophie states that everyone believes in fate in some way. Sophie says that fate, superstition and religion are all basically the same thing. Another question that Sophie is asked is sickness the punishment of the gods? Sophie’s thought that it would be crazy for the two to be related but she reasoned that people pray for health all the time, so why wouldn’t they have a say in it? The last question is “What governs the course of history?” Sophie reasoned that people dictate the course of history. I agree free will is something we have and that fate is as Noah said a bunch of nonsense. I think if some higher being was out there and idk if there is then wouldn’t it be much more exciting to see what us little people will do next instead of knowing everything that just seems

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