Sigmund Freud's Theory Of Psychoanalysis Essay

Great Essays
Introduction
Sigmund Freud. A man who heavily influenced psychology in the twentieth century with his radical ideas of dreams, childhood, sexuality and the role of the unconscious. Freud is known as the father of psychoanalysis; a system of therapy that was utilized to release repressed emotions and experiences into the conscious mind of the patient. The fundamental principles of psychoanalysis are heavily debated since there is no clear scientific evidence proving Freud 's theories to be accurate. Scientist disprove the validity of psychoanalysis because it lacks empirical data, and heavily depends on clinical data as its main form of evidence. Many psychologist still believe in psychoanalysis and apply psychoanalytic principles to their therapeutic practice. Some believe in the influence
…show more content…
Psychoanalysis "is so vague that it cannot be tested properly" (YaleCourses, 2008). Therefore, Freud 's theory cannot be proven wrong because it lacks specifics, it cannot be falsifiable. Since a plethora of Freud 's theories claimed to be evident through psychoanalysis, his theory cannot be experimented properly. A well-known professor at Berkeley, Fredrick Crews is a huge critic of Freud, especially the idea of psychoanalysis. He does not believe the idea is "empirically well grounded" and Freud was too biased into forming his evidence(Dentzer, 1999). Crews believe Freud theory was disconfirmed, as during the Freud 's therapy sessions "if a patient denied that something had happened in his life, Freud would say well, he’s resisting it, therefore it did happen, therefore this is a reason why he’s ill"(Dentzer, 1999). Moreover, many individuals believed psychoanalysis needed more evidence from other individuals than Freud, as well as Freud 's act of committing fraudulent sessions by handling the outcome of the patient towards his desired

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    This is shown because the Oedipus case study only explains meanings about itself. In addition, the case of Anna O by Freud and Breuer ( ) fails to meet the criteria of science because it cannot be tested. testability. However, Hinshelwood (2010) points out that single cases studies can be tested. Some academics argue that psychoanalysis is not a science because it cannot be falsified.…

    • 1086 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    22). He further points out that the characters do not have any psyche, as they are only a figment of the author’s minds. He insists that psychoanalysis wouldn’t work because it cannot analyze the psyche of the character and would be instead the author and the norms of society behaviours at that age (Dowden, 1992, p. 22). Another problem he mentions is that psychoanalysts are not trained nor are they equipped to analyze the writings of characters from myths. Dowden critiques psychoanalysis by essentially stating that for psychoanalysis to work properly, it would require many prerequisites (Dowden, 1992, p. 22).…

    • 1419 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The first is that the addict has no power over the drug, and the second is that the addict is a selfish criminal (Szalavitz). She believes neither are true, therefore current treatment or punishment for addiction is ineffective (Szalavitz passim). Richard Wilson, a professor in the School of Public Health and Information Sciences at the University of Louisille, and Cheryl Kolander, a professor in the College of Education and Human Development, wrote Drug Abuse Prevention and has some insightful information on Szalavitz’s claims. Wilson and Kolander believe that the public and even experts are wrong in thinking that addiction is a disease by stating, “the so-called ‘disease concept’ or ‘medical model’ maintains that addiction is a biological trait, probably inherited, that gets progressively worse” (271). This “disease concept” implies that the user has no control over the addition and possibly even inherited the addiction (Wilson and Kolander 271).…

    • 2363 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    (Graham, 5). Freud didn’t really care about the classifications of different mental illnesses, because he believed that the human mind was so complex, and that everyone else’s mind was so different in the way that unconscious forces impacted…

    • 788 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Is God An Illusion Essay

    • 825 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Do No Harm Freud has made valuable contributions to the field of psychology; however, much of what Freud has said about complexes and stages have been called into question because they lack empirical support. Furthermore, Freud’s theories tend to have a fairly sexist bias. The idea that people seek a “father figure” is yet another example of Freud’s bias. The idea that God is an illusion and that religion is a neurosis is less based on empirical evidence than it is on personal perspectives and biases. It is therefore ironic that Freud attempts to debunk God on the basis of science yet so thoroughly comes short of using the scientific method.…

    • 825 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    This topic has empirical support for the bad uses and the negatives of restrictive procedures but lacks giving alternatives or looking at the effectiveness of restrictive procedures. Empirical support of the effectiveness of the procedures is vital for psychologists who are using procedures that have no empirical support. A psychologist using these procedures is working unethically and breaking the code of conduct. Empirical knowledge that supports these restrictive procedure treatments can be used as guidelines for other psychologist but since the field lacks this aspect psychologist should not use restrictive procedures (Sturmey, 2009). This is important because psychology is a science field and every treatment, medication, or procedure needs to have empirical support by many sources to make sure it will help benefit the…

    • 1320 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    William Glasser rejected the Freudian Model because he did not agree with Freud’s principles. As we know that Glasser’s reality therapy focuses on choice and how we deal with our behaviors. A difference between reality therapy and psychoanalytic…

    • 1198 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    It is hard to determine causality of CVD from AS use simply because they have not studied enough users. Statements like the one above are what has caused disagreements among athletes and medical professionals. World record squat holder and weightlifting coach, Brandon Smitley, chooses not to partake in AAS use even though AAS use is widespread in his sport (Smitley). He also agrees the scientific community has over-exaggerated the side effects of anabolic usage. Due to the limited studies, Angell then discusses how the recent information linking CVD to AS use is “largely contradictory and inconclusive” (130).…

    • 1727 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Jung found controversy with Freud’s focus on sexuality as a key motivating behavioral force in obsession-compulsion disorder (Frey-Rohn, 1974). Jung also disagreed with Freud’s concept of the unconscious mind, stating it to be too limited and overly negative (Alamo,…

    • 1773 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Ergot In Hysteria

    • 1560 Words
    • 7 Pages

    In some cases, it was too hard for most to understand that it was not witchcraft because most Puritans, believed that if an event could not be explained it was the work of the devil. There were some who believed witchcraft was not the reason and in Science and Justice by Sanford J. Fox, he analyzes many of the events from a logical point of view. Fox, finds documentation and states, “Dr. Meric Casaubon’s cautions in this regard is especially significant because it is directed partly at what was then a poorly understood area of mental disorders (“melancholy”) where ignorance-and hence a diagnosis of witchcraft-was highly likely” (65).…

    • 1560 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays

Related Topics