Sigmund Freud's Theory Of Psychoanalysis Essay

1351 Words 6 Pages
Introduction
Sigmund Freud. A man who heavily influenced psychology in the twentieth century with his radical ideas of dreams, childhood, sexuality and the role of the unconscious. Freud is known as the father of psychoanalysis; a system of therapy that was utilized to release repressed emotions and experiences into the conscious mind of the patient. The fundamental principles of psychoanalysis are heavily debated since there is no clear scientific evidence proving Freud 's theories to be accurate. Scientist disprove the validity of psychoanalysis because it lacks empirical data, and heavily depends on clinical data as its main form of evidence. Many psychologist still believe in psychoanalysis and apply psychoanalytic principles to their therapeutic practice. Some believe in the influence
…show more content…
Psychoanalysis "is so vague that it cannot be tested properly" (YaleCourses, 2008). Therefore, Freud 's theory cannot be proven wrong because it lacks specifics, it cannot be falsifiable. Since a plethora of Freud 's theories claimed to be evident through psychoanalysis, his theory cannot be experimented properly. A well-known professor at Berkeley, Fredrick Crews is a huge critic of Freud, especially the idea of psychoanalysis. He does not believe the idea is "empirically well grounded" and Freud was too biased into forming his evidence(Dentzer, 1999). Crews believe Freud theory was disconfirmed, as during the Freud 's therapy sessions "if a patient denied that something had happened in his life, Freud would say well, he’s resisting it, therefore it did happen, therefore this is a reason why he’s ill"(Dentzer, 1999). Moreover, many individuals believed psychoanalysis needed more evidence from other individuals than Freud, as well as Freud 's act of committing fraudulent sessions by handling the outcome of the patient towards his desired

Related Documents

Related Topics