Weaknesss And Strengths Of Freud And Phychoanalytic Theory

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1. What are some strengths and weaknesses of Freud’s ideas? There are a number of strengths and weaknesses associated with Freud, and his development of psychoanalytic theory. Through his introduction of the three major systems of personality: the id, the ego, and the superego, Freud thoroughly explained how the collaboration of all three systems contributed to the developing personality. With his consideration of the role of the unconscious mind, Freud prepared the way for the growth of other theories; his work served as a baseline for other theorists to expand upon, and thereby allowed for the continuation and development of Freudian constructs. Although Freud’s greatest contributions of the unconscious, and the levels of consciousness, are …show more content…
How and why are inferiority feelings useful and important? Give one or two concrete examples to illustrate your point. (You can make up the example or give true life examples). In the fourth grade, I was introduced to the mathematical operation of multiplication. Once a week, my teacher tested my classmates and I on our ability to multiply by giving us a quiz, of which consisted of twelve randomized multiplication problems associated with a particular number. After distributing a quiz to each student, my teacher set her timer for one minute. In that minute, she expected us to complete the quiz in its entirety, without flaw. If a flaw were found upon grading, meaning that at least one answer was marked incorrect, we would fail the quiz for that week, and ultimately be denied a sticker. This sticker symbolized our comprehension of the material, and was utilized to track our progression on a large chart in the back of the classroom. It was not until I began struggling to learn the material that I became aware of the individual progression of my classmates. I became cognizant of my inability to learn at the same pace as my peers, and thereby experienced a feeling of inferiority. Inferiority feelings are normal, and beneficial in that they can lead to a recompensing drive for superiority. As evidenced by the example I provided, the inability to retain, and properly execute an understanding of the mathematical material prohibited me from learning at the same pace as my peers, and thereby feel inferior to them. Being able to physically track the progress of my peers, in accordance with my own progress, drove me to learn the information needed to advance to the next multiplication

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