Rise Of The Islamic State

1097 Words 5 Pages
The Islamic State is a large, violent, and Islamic organization that has recently emerged as the new face of terror following the Syrian revolution and the withdrawal of US troops from Iraq. Their main goal is to establish a global caliphate and unite the Ummah. In July 2014 the Islamic State started its own propaganda magazine called Dabiq. In the first issue there is a feature article entitled “From Hijrah to Khilafah”. This article accounts the history, methods, and motives behind the Islamic State. Despite that rise of the Islamic State followed the publication by Beverly Milton-Edwards’ book Islamic Fundamentalism Since 1945, the origins of the group are deeply affected by factors expounded upon in the book. Based on the article, IS is …show more content…
This is true, as to the members of IS, the Middle Eastern states of the 20th represent years of Muslim repression and the bastardization of Islam, and act as a call to arms. In the article they call the dictators of these groups tawaghit, which means one who has crossed the limits or rebels. It signifies people who not only rebel against the tenet that one must obey Allah, but also imposes this belief upon others. In their eyes these oppressive secular states represented the highest form of blasphemy. IS wages war against central authority in order to prevent the return of the oppressive regimes or “ a status quo- consisting of powerful security intelligence and security agencies- allowed the tawaghit to crush any Islamic movement that tried to only slightly raised its head and whisper it’s creed.” This resonates strongly with the characterization of states in which “those who dared to oppose the state were thrown in prison, tortured and executed as traitors and enemies of the state,” that Milton-Edwards creates in her book. IS fears so strongly that this repression could return that the article advocates for the complete destruction of the nation state system in which these dictators operated. To replace the destroyed system, they believe that the establishment of the khilafah would yield prosperity and justice for Muslims. The article …show more content…
Unorganized and weak central power is imperative for IS to function. The article mentions how Abu Mus’ab az-Zarqawi, the intellectual father behind IS, chose Afghanistan and Kurdistan because they lacked a powerful police state to form Jama’atut- Tawihidi wal-Jihad, the predecessor to IS. This clearly speaks to Beverly Milton-Edwards’ claim that weak or failed states result in a propensity for conflict and increasing terrorism. The article elaborates on this point by outlining that not only are terrorist groups like Jama’atut- Tawihidi wal-Jihad more likely to emerge, but they also migrate to other areas of conflict in order expand and ensure the success of their organization. In the article the initial phases on the road to khilafah “consist of immigrating to a land with a weak central authority to use as a base where a jama’ah can form, recruit members, and train them.” Milton-Edwards discusses this phenomenon in regards to the Mujahidin of Afghanistan and how jihadists took advantage of territorial and nationalist conflicts in Bosnia and Philippines in order to propagate the notion of the pan-Islamic jihad. This link is made ever more applicable as Abu Mus’ab was an member of the Afghan Mujahidin and he then subsequently entered the conflicts in Syria and Iraq in order to further the mission of his organization. In cases where

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