Pros And Cons Of The Sino-Japanese War

1653 Words 7 Pages
“This nation will remain a neutral nation, but I cannot ask that every American remain neutral in thought as well,” proclaimed President Franklin D. Roosevelt when World War Two began in Europe (Brinkley, 728). A remarkable amount of the population in the United States favored Great Britain, France, and the rest of the Allied nations over the Axis powers which consisted of Japan, Italy, and Germany. However, the American government did not want to get involved in another war, so they isolated themselves. In the Spring of 1940, Germany invaded western Europe causing one nation after another to fall. Then, Italy joined Germany and aided in the invasion of France. After all the attacks and invasions, all that was left was a weak British army. …show more content…
After World War One, Japan was very powerful and wanted to expand their empire into the Pacific. During WWI, Japan took over a Chinese region called Manchuria; moreover, the League of Nations and America wanted them to evacuate from the region, but they would not leave. Japan continued to annihilate thousands of citizens in large massacres from Chinese regions including the Nanjing Massacre. The reason America cared so much about the invasion in China was because of the “Open Door Policy” set up years before saying that all countries were to respect China and trade with them. Due the Sino-Japanese War, Japan began to depend on America for steel and oil because their island had few natural resources. To pressure Japan to stop the war with China, Roosevelt made it impossible for Japan to receive oil and other needed resources to keep their military functioning. Japan chose to continue the war in China and find a new way to get oil. Oil was available in the Dutch East Indies; however, Japan thought that they would need to neutralize America in Asia before securing the colony. Japan knew that they needed to immobilize America in the Pacific if they wanted to expand the war; therefore, military planners outlined an attack on the U.S. harbor in Hawaii (Brinkley, 726). Japan hoped that this attack would grant them full access to the Pacific and cripple the American military …show more content…
A possible question of whether or not it was known that Pearl Harbor was going to be bombed arose as well. In the book President Roosevelt and the Coming of the War, Charles A. Beard states that America forced Japan into taking harsh actions by cutting off trade. He said that it was all provocative and that Roosevelt’s administration had to have known about the attack because of their knowledge of cracking codes (Brinkley, 734). The quote, “The question was how we should maneuver them into the position of firing the first shot,” said by President Roosevelt was used to support Beard’s ideas. The most credible book I believe is by Gordon W. Prange called At Dawn We Slept. He says that the Roosevelt administration made many mistakes in interpreting Japan’s strategies. The Officials had plenty of information where they would be able to decipher the attack, but they were careless and failed to do so. He emphasized how Japan had an “ambitious operation that few Americans believed possible” and that was why we did not expect such a large attack (Brinkley,

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