Shweikart And Allan Imperialism And The Civil War

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Discussion Question 4: Schweikart and Allen described U.S participation in World War II as reluctant, but once engaged in fighting, they became a powerful force. Zinn agreed, but also felt as though there were selfish, imperial intentions. Though described as warring with Hitler as a last resort, Roosevelt felt as though the United States’ interests and security were threatened, and therefore they entered the war. On December 7, 1941 the infamous bombing of Pearl Harbor occurred, shocking the secure, powerful nation of the United States. These historians described the motives behind this attack as Japan’s own imperialist intentions. Japan wanted to expand their empire eastward, therefore they attacked the allied powers of Malaysia, the Philippines, …show more content…
Schweikart and Allen described both the peaceful protests led by Martin Luther King Jr. along with the violent protests instigated by the Black Panthers. Both groups were fighting for the equality of people of color. To illustrate his point, Zinn took excerpts of poetry from influential poets like Langston Hughes. These pieces depicted the emotional pain of growing up in a society where people like him were treated poorly due to their skin color. Zinn also explained that many black people during this time were pro Communism, as it promoted equality. Both historians discussed the same events, people, and groups involved in the civil rights movements, but in different ways. They spoke of the Scottsboro incident, the bus boycott, bombing of the Birmingham Baptist Church, the peaceful march from Selma to Montgomery, and the influence of Martin Luther King Jr 's “I have a dream speech.” They depicted the influence of people like MLK, Rosa Parks, Langston Hughes, Malcolm X, Robert Williams, the Rockefellers, and many other influential people during this era. Both historians also discussed the influence of the same groups such as the KKK, SNCC, the Black Panthers, and the violence that these groups produced. Zinn had a more sympathetic tone towards those fighting for their equality, and included more information about the cultural background and importance to civil rights. …show more content…
Back home there was wide scale opposition to the war as the casualties and losses began to add up. A large part of the population that opposed and protested the war were the baby boomers who were then in college and of draft age. As the war trudged on, many unsuccessful battles were fought. Soldiers began to wonder what the reasons behind fighting were, therefore dividing the United States forces. The United States was also fighting a war at home for civil rights, which clouded the war efforts in Vietnam. All of these pieces put together caused the United States to fail regarding pushing Communism out of Vietnam. Zinn also discussed the imperial interests of the United States to rid the threat of Communism and to keep the world safe for Capitalism. He discussed how the Vietnamese despised the unfair rule under the French and therefore opted for a Communist government lead by Ho Chi Minh. The support of Communism in Vietnam pulled the United States into this infamous international

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