Rhetorical Analysis Of The Pearl Harbor Speech

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On December 7th, 1941, Pearl Harbor was attacked by Japanese forces. The next day, Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed the United States Congress with his memorable speech, the Pearl Harbor Address to the Nation. The goal of his speech was to urge Congress to formally declare war on Japan and rally American people to support the war effort. The main points of his speech were that the Japanese government launched an attack against Malaya, Hong Kong, Guam, the Philippine Islands, Wake Island, and Midway Island. Japan took an offensive all over the Pacific area. Also, their country was in danger too, so they should their armed forces and support to fight back. The distance of Hawaii from Japan shows that the attack was planned a long time ago, so …show more content…
He seems to be consciously aiming for a response from Congress and the American people, which makes the argument. The speaker tries to make the reader care by using examples of how Japan caused many attacks in the Pacific area and they should defend themselves from the inevitable. He also uses this evidence to describe where and when Japan attacked, promoting support of the nation. He uses rhetorical devices such as repetition, discord, and ramifications. For example, he uses the phrase "Japanese forces attacked..." repetitively in his speech, "the attack yesterday on the Hawaiian islands has caused severe damage to American naval and military forces" shows strife in the United States, and he describes possibilities and consequences if they do not do anything to prevent their attacks. John F. Kennedy 's Ich bin ein Berliner ("I am a 'Berliner ') Speech was on 1963. His goal was to illustrate the United States position on the Berlin Wall and communism and to give support and encouragement to the people of East Berlin. The message was aimed as much at the Soviets as it was at Berliners and was a clear statement of U.S. policy in the wake of the construction of the Berlin Wall. The main point of the speech was …show more content…
Ford delivered the "Address After Taking the Oath of the Presidency," on August 9th, 1974. Ford 's goal was to address the citizens and gain their support or trust when he leads the nation. The main point of his speech was that even though people did not elect him as president, he served as vice-president for many years with the support of close family and friends. The structure of the speech helps him make the argument by creating an emotional, yet serious impression by saying "This is an hour of history that troubles our minds and hurts our hearts." However, it 's a joyous moment for him and his friends when he describes that his friends elected him as vice-president in the beginning. He also wants to talk casually as an equal during his speech because he wanted their trust in leading the nation. The speaker uses evidence by showing he can lead the nation. He used anecdotes of how he did not have any debts other to his wife, how he became vice-president, Watergate, and how the Constitution works. He became president due to the 25th Amendment in the Constitution. The speaker tries to make the reader care by letting them know that he would be leading the country until the next election in the 1970s. Also, everyone was involved in politics because the government runs the country and they make important decisions for us on our behalf. President Ford promised to the best he could and had followed God 's path. The rhetorical devices he used were allusion by

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