The Battle Of Midway: Lessons Learned

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The Battle of Midway: Lessons Learned

In the months following the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii by the Empire of Japan, the United States found itself embroiled in conflict in two theaters of war; in Europe, North Africa, and the Atlantic as well as in the Pacific. Through the preceding years, the United States cautiously escalated its support for the Allied countries in the European theater with Anglo-American partnership programs such as the Lend-Lease Act and Destroyers for Bases until war was declared on Germany and Italy in order maintain a measure of neutrality. In contrast, the deliberate attack on Pearl Harbor surprised the nation and ignited an unanimous fervor for the destruction of the Japanese war machine. As the Japanese marched across Southeast Asia and the
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After Midway there was no feeling that we had won the war. No doubt it was the all-important turning point, but we still had a tenacious enemy to deal with and a difficult job to do.” The battle of Midway was a pivotal moment in the Pacific theater in which the United States was able to capitalize on the momentum gained at the battle of Coral Sea and the application of decisive leadership and the use of timely intelligence in order to dispel the aura of invincibility held by the Imperial Japanese Navy. While the discussion of the battle of Midway has been evaluated and dissected many times over— to the level of detail that has spawned many volumes of books—this paper is intended to merely identify the lessons learned and how they may be used in their root form today.
The battle of Midway was undoubtedly significant in the

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