Ferguson And Brown Vs Board Of Education Case Study

Superior Essays
Cordell Adams
Holt
Legal systems
8 October 2017

Plessy v.s Ferguson and Brown v.s Board of education
Huge changes to equal rights in America all started in 1892 from two cases, first Homère Patrice Adolphe Plessy v.s judge John H. Ferguson followed by Oliver Brown v.s Board of Education. The Plessy v.s Ferguson case first created the idea of separate but equal in 1896, but in 1954 that changed, in a good way due to the popular case known as Brown v.s Board of education. These cases Plessy v.s Ferguson and Brown v.s Board of education both severely impacted segregation in America, the reason why we are not splitting up bus seats and schools based on race. First, 1892 the change started with a court decision “separate but equal from
…show more content…
According to BillofRightsInst, A man named Thurgood Marshall Argued that the segregation of schools violated the 14th amendment which states that, “No state shall… deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of laws. Several different segregation issues from around the country got combined into one case. The case from Oliver Brown, a 3rd grade African American student from Topeka, led the list. Linda was denied acceptance into white schools close to her home, therefore she was forced to attend a school miles away. Thurgood Marshall argued that the white school a way higher quality school then the blacks, but it really wasn't in Topeka. This lead to a question, can schools really be equal if the are separated by skin color. The Supreme Court Heard the case in 1953, the justices became strongly decided so they decided to put the case on hold. While on hold, Chief Justice, Fred Vinson died. He was replaced by Earl Warren. Earl believed segregation was unconstitutional, understanding the south wouldn't agree, he believed a unanimous decision was needed. When resumed in 1954 the court was still divided, some beloved segregation was a violation of the 14th amendment’s equality. Some believed it was a segregation issue and the decision should be left the the …show more content…
The minority said that the law was unconstitutional and violated the civil rights, this side was correct but did not win. The court went by the doctrine “separate but equal” meaning two races must be separated but have equal quality. Until in 1945 when Oliver brown helped start the complaint that the schools aren't equal. The majority this time won saying that segregation was hurting the society, then they decided it was unconstitutional. These cases are both very related because they both fight segregation. Brown v.s Board case showed that separate is NOT equal if we are separating schools based on race. Instead of segregation helping the society the Supreme Court declared segregation was hurting the society and this lead to the change of America forever with voting and civil rights acts

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The court ruled that although the facilities of the schools may be equal, the inherently inferior way that the segregated school system made the colored children feel deprived them of education and educational opportunities, therefor it wasn't truly "separate but equal" and was in fact unconstitutional. A year later, the Supreme Court addressed ways of implementation of their previous Brown vs Board of Education ruling. They decided to charge local governments to begin the process of desegregating the public schools in their areas, and federal courts to oversee and determine whether the local governments were actually working on desegregation. Brown won their Supreme Court case, which not only ruled segregation unconstitutional, it also forced the US into…

    • 965 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    After hearing arguments that racial segregation violated the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, Chief Justice Earl Warren ruled in favor of Brown in 1954. Schools were no longer allowed to be racially segregated, because black and white children needed good education to be successful in life. “The long-held doctrine that separate facilities were permissible provided they were equal was rejected” ("Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka."). Because this decision affected such a large amount of people in such a life-altering way, this Supreme Court case was the best and most important one in the twentieth…

    • 1660 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Brown argued that racial segregation violated the Equal Protection Clause because the city’s black and white schools weren't equal to each other. The federal district court ignored his statement, ruling that the segregated public schools were considerably equal enough to be constitutional. Brown sent a request to the U.S Supreme Court, which considered, then reviewed all the school segregation actions together. The Court spoke in a unanimous decision written by Chief Justice Earl Warren. The decision ultimately upheld that racial segregation of African American children in public schools is a violation of the Equal Protection Clause of…

    • 744 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Throughout history people have looked down on others because of their appearance or their race. In America up until the 1950 's the problem of prejudice was manifested through segregation. The Supreme Court ruling of Brown v. Board of Education impacted society by officially desegregating public education, making racism illegal, and setting a precedent of equality within the legal system. Brown v. Board of Education is told to be one of the greatest Supreme Court decisions of the 20th century (Mcbride 1). The case was named after Rev.…

    • 1156 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Board of Education, the Supreme Court overturned the precedent set in Plessy v. Ferguson, ruling that separate, but equal is unconstitutional under the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment. The court decided that the doctrine of separate facilities for blacks and whites creates an inherit sense of inequality. Furthermore, schools are places to teach children how to socialize and interact with one another and if the idea of whites and blacks being unequal is prevalent in schools, it will be relevant in society for generations to come. Their decision highlighted the importance of education in the opinion authored by Chief Justice Warren, “Compulsory school attendance laws and the great expenditures for education both demonstrate our recognition of the importance of education to our democratic society. It is required in the performance of our most basic public responsibilities, even service in the armed forces.…

    • 960 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    They both were Supreme Court cases that related to race. These cases showed both sides of the debatable topic of segregation in the late 1800s and the 1900s. Both cases dealt with the government or school board violating an innocent person’s Fourteenth Amendment right. In both cases, at least one judge implied that colored people are inferior to white people. These people were doing no harm to the white people around them, yet they were raised to feel inferior to the other race.…

    • 723 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    During the 1950s schools were segregated by race. Linda Brown had to go through a dangerous railroad route to get to her bus stop even though she lived close to a school but it was only for white people. Brown and her family said that the segregated school system violated the 14th amendment. The federal court stated that segregation in education was harmful because of this. And the court decided that states requiring separate but equal violated the Equal Protection clause of the 14th amendment (History channel) Luckily the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Brown.…

    • 781 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    On May 14, 1954, whilst delivering his verdict, Chief Justice Warren delivered the opinion of the Court, stating that "We conclude that in the field of public education the doctrine of ‘separate but equal’ has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal." This meant that segregation was illegal and must be stopped. The judge didn't say how it was to be stopped, instead leaving it up to individual states to work out. Olivia Brown and 12 other negro parents brought a case in the US District Court against the Topeka Board of Education which provided separate schools for Negroes and whites.…

    • 687 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Ferguson did not actually succeed in creating educational equality. As stated in the previous response, the fundamental requirement for success in society requires an education be provided. Prior to the aforementioned court ruling, schools for African American students were in terrible condition (186, 14). Students who attended these schools were not able to receive same opportunities in life as white students, and the “separate but equal” doctrine aimed to solve it. Under this doctrine, schools were segregated still based on races, but had to be equal, especially in terms of quality and resources.…

    • 701 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Plessy V. Court Case Study

    • 1776 Words
    • 8 Pages

    The Browns took their case to the Supreme Court. According to landmark cases.org “The Court decided that state laws requiring separate but equal schools violated the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.” The Majority Opinion was that “separate but equal” facilities are inherently unequal. In Plessy the court had looked at tangible things like transportation, buildings and teacher salaries. In Brown, the court examined the subtle intangible effects of segregation in public education such as making blacks feel inferior. Many schools were separating children solely based on race creating inferiority.…

    • 1776 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays