My Philosophy As A Teacher

1474 Words 6 Pages
I will become an Early Childhood Education teacher one day. The type of teacher I will be is dependent on my type of philosophy. My philosophy will help me determine crucial aspects like how I want my classroom set up, the different ways I will teach my students, what kinds of goals and decisions I will make, and ultimately what I want my students to take out of my class when the end of the year comes. To some degree, I am a combination of all the types of philosophies: essentialist, perennialist, progressivist, existentialist, and behaviorist. However, I have one type of philosophy that stands out most: progressivist. Progressivism stresses explaining real-life problems and working towards the complete development of an individual (Eggen & …show more content…
The way I construct my classroom should resemble real-life like the type of area they live in, the places they go, and how they fit into the big scheme of the world; almost like smaller versions of their life (Saçli Uzunöz, 2016). Through the multiple subjects I will teach like math, English, science, and social studies, my philosophy pushes me to provide them real-life situations, offer possible skills to solve the problems, and then allow them to work together and run with whichever skill to solve that problem (Saçli Uzunöz, 2016). My job as an educator is not to be the only source of information nor merely an authority figure. It is my job to be a facilitator and lead my students to deeper level of thinking (G. Peters, 2012). I want to promote that deeper level of understanding because I believe the greatest thing a student can be is …show more content…
Regularly I would ask my students to give me thumbs up or thumbs down if they are understanding my lesson so far. Other options that work in Early Childhood classrooms is using exit slips as a guide to who is where in understanding the lesson or giving each student a red card and a green card to silently place on their desk during work time to mean that he/she is good to go or he/she needs some extra guidance. The key for students to have success is to devalue grades and standardized tests, and instead promote active and integrated learning that shows how the student is developing on all levels (Ellison & Little, 2015). Many students feel pressured and anxious about getting a good enough grade. Exams also have no way of showing what the student has learned, but only what the student can memorize. Especially in Early Childhood, I think it is important that I do not define my students by what grade they can get on an exam, but instead what problems they have worked through, how their social skills are growing, and how they are making connections between the classroom and their

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