Montessori Method Essay

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In this summary, I am going to talk about the difference between Maths in the Montessori Method. Although the children who attend Montessori preschools have had numerous years working on the concepts of numbers, heights, weights and much more, the children do not begin working with the maths material from the Montessori curriculum straight away. Instead, each child is prepared indirectly for the use of the Maths way of thinking through the Montessori Area of both Sensorial and Practical Life work. This helps each child to develop the essential abilities needed for the higher level maths which they will learn in the 6 to 9 environment. The Montessori curriculum aims to develop a knowledge in the mathematical skills whether that be through problem …show more content…
They are able to create mental pictures and manipulate images in their minds. Montessori math materials help children form these intellectual images to adapt to the concepts and skills. The child will repeat until they feel there is no need to repeat activities for the sake of repetition, because they have learnt it. The elementary child requires materials which offer repetition but with more change.
As the Montessori preschool student moves closer and closer to having an abstraction way of learning, the need for the child to use the materials for a long time shortens. All Montessori math lessons are presented first with the materials, but the old child quickly moves from concrete materials to abstract ones. It is in this stage where practical use of mathematics is important. Montessori students for the age of six, enjoy learning how maths can fits in the grand scheme of the cosmic education. This includes studying ancient mathematicians such as Pythagoras, Euclid, Eratosthenes and
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For a child to reach this. He or she will need to have a firm, prepared base. In the 3 to 6 class, the child will learn through concrete forms of the numbers with little language. He will use sensorial material like the long rods, which come in tens to see a concrete version of the decimal which he will learn to record in the 6 to 9 classroom. By getting a good foundation, the child is able to understand the reason for working with material like the long rods. They 6 to 9 child must have a lot of repetition, memorisation and abstraction. The children want to find the quantity, build, and reconstruct objects and recipes. They use their excitement and their imaginations which they are in their sensitive period for to test the theories in the Montessori environment. A child would not have done this in the 3 to 6 classroom because they simply would know have known how to. They become proud and astonished when they are able to solve difficult mathematical systems such as square and cube root without the use of modern

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