Compare And Contrast Maria Montessorri And Albert Bandura

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Theorist Paper
Maria Montessori vs. Albert Bandura
Clarissa L. Eashmond
The University of Southern Mississippi

Abstract The theorist paper will discuss, compare, and contrast the theories of Dr. Maria Montessori and Albert Bandura. This theorist assignment includes the research of how each theorist began their work, and how children learn according to their ideas and observations.

Clarissa Eashmond
November 14, 2017
CD 351
Theorist Paper

Theory, it defined by Merriam-Webster, in relation to the development of children, as a plausible or scientifically acceptable general principle or body of principles offered to explain phenomena. It is also defined as an idea or set of ideas that is intended
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She believed that adults spent too much time “serving” children. She cautioned teachers to remember that children who are not allowed to do something for themselves do not learn how to do it. Montessori understood that it is sometimes much easier to do something for children than it is to take the time and energy to teach them to do it for themselves. But she also believed that for children to grow and develop skills, the adults in their lives need to make opportunities for children to do things for themselves. Fostering independence is part of Montessori’s …show more content…
Montessori simply believes that children are to learn in the most natural and life-supporting environments allowing them to live freely and to make their own choices. The teachers are to adapt the environment so that the children can fulfill their greatest potential, physically, cognitively, and emotionally. Dr. Montessori, developed her methods and theories by observing. Likewise, Bandura developed his theories by observing but his observations developed the social learning theory. The difference between the two theorists, the Montessori method is about educating children and allowing them to experience the ways of the world by allowing them to take on different responsibilities because children always want to help. Bandura’s social learning theory, is more about how certain behaviors influence children to reciprocate those same actions. It explains human behaviors and encompasses the child’s mental cognition skills. In conclusion, some of the most common people can shed light on the complex minds of our children. Dr. Montessori and Albert Bandura, believed in taking the time to observe first, create a hypothesis, and conduct experiments in order to come up with a logical theory or the best teaching method. Their theories and ideas are prevalent and still used today in classrooms and child development centers all over the world. It is amazing how two different people with different

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