Phonological Awareness

Superior Essays
Minilesson One: Phonological Awareness
Natalie Marchetti
Georgia Gwinnett College

Dr. Jennifer Greene
READ 3200 Approaches to Reading Instruction
September 24, 2017

Minilesson One: Phonological Awareness
Introduction:
The purpose of this phonological awareness minilesson is to develop students’ abilities to distinguish between spoken words containing / æ / sounds and words containing the / ɛ / sound. Phonological Awareness is defined as knowledge about the sound structure of words, at the phoneme, onset-rime, and syllable levels (Cunningham, 2013). It is important for students to have phonological awareness so they can manipulate the shortest sound, or phoneme in order to sound out unfamiliar words (Tompkins, 2013). Understanding
…show more content…
The characteristics of behaviorism are displayed in this minilesson through providing information, or, the guided practice; while observing the response of the students using the black or red cards when the educator says the words aloud in a sentence (Tompkins, 2013). Constructivism views students as active and engaged learners who create their own knowledge (Tompkins, 2013). This theory is displayed in this minilesson through students making connections with the emphasized words with prior knowledge of words that were learned in the previous lesson from the day before (Tompkins, 2013). Tompkins (2013) stated that knowledge is organized into cognitive structures called schemas. The Schema Theory defines the way students learn (Tompkins, 2013). The Schema Theory is shown in this minilesson through the revision process known as assimilation (Tompkins, 2013). The integration of previously stored knowledge from prior lessons with new knowledge allows connections to be formed (Tompkins, 2013). John Dewey suggested that students are naturally curious and effectively create their own information while discovering that coordinated effort instead of competition, is more helpful for learning (Tompkins, 2013). Inquiry Learning is when students collaborate with each other and the educator in the classroom (Tompkins, 2013). The inquiry learning is displayed through the guided practice of this minilesson (Tompkins, 2013). The last theory being discussed is the Engagement Theory. Children are more drawn in when they take an interest in engaging educational exercises (Tompkins, 2013). Students with self-efficacy that work with schoolmates are more likely to succeed (Tompkins, 2013). When the teacher encourages the students to share other words like, pat and let, that is initiating the students to collaborate with each other to

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    A study conducted by Boekaerts (2002) found, “Students’ motivational beliefs function as a frame that guides their thinking, feelings, and their action in a particular domain (Mensah and Atta, 2015 p. 21)”. If teachers have a better understanding of the emotional and academic support needed by their students during this transitional period, they can make adjustments to their teaching strategies, learning environment, structure, and student involvement, to best suit the needs of their students. For example, if a teacher has a more active class, more stimulated hands on activities may help the students become more involved in active learning. Additionally, if the class is slower or not catching on as quickly, the teacher can adjust the instruction…

    • 1589 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    nquiry-Based instruction is the teaching method researched for this paper. The research collected shows the importance of inquiry-based instruction in the 21st century schools. The students today need more instruction to allow them to discover the answer to the problem instead of the teacher always modeling the problems. Inquiry-Based instruction is a student centered teaching method and the students work in pairs or groups to solve problems. Studies have shown that students retain the information better when given the opportunity to connect meaning to their learning.…

    • 1030 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The focus of my lesson plan was on Vygotsky’s sociocultural theory. I chose to use this theory due to an article by Abdul Panhwar on Vygotsky’s theory and how a child’s intellectual development can be broken down into two stages. Stage one is that children learn through communicating and interacting with other people. Stage two is that children are able to strengthen what they have learned by themselves after having help from peer collaboration (Panhwar, 2016, p. 183-184). Therefore, according to this article Vygotsky’s sociocultural theory emphasizes communication and helps students to acquire more knowledge from the interaction of peers, teachers, and parents.…

    • 916 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Summary of Lesson Plan Gagne’s Instructional design is based on his conditions of learning. His holistic view on teaching gives structure and organization to instructor’s lesson plans. The model is designed to help student’s process mental events that occur with various types of stimuli that focus on learning outcomes. There are nine events that focus on specific aspects of learning. Event one is directed toward gaining the students attention, event two focuses on providing a learning objective, event three concentrates on how to stimulate recall so the learning process can be facilitated, event four emphasizes how new content is presented to the student, event five provides guidance for learning, event six allows students to practice what…

    • 1326 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Jones classroom is comprehension monitoring. Routman (2000, p. 134) defines comprehension monitoring as “a metacognitive process, which is affected by person strategy and task variables.” This is a great strategy that directs students to make more sense of the text. During the reading workshop, Mr. Jones can teach metacognitive strategies for the student to use before reading to learn how to be aware of the material to comprehend. Once the students apply the strategy when reading, readers begin to reread, look back through text they didn’t fully perceive the first time and take their time reading. The second strategy that can be used in the classroom is graphic and semantic organizers.…

    • 769 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Introduction To Feedback

    • 1233 Words
    • 5 Pages

    This principal encourages teachers to set up opportunities for students to be involved in explicit discussions in response to assessment, where the teacher not only focuses on providing input but prompts students in initiating ways they can progress forward in achieving their learning goals (Readman & Allen, 2013). Providing opportunities to act on feedback allows students to understand and justify the grade given. This principals benefits students learning as they gain cognitive understanding of ways they can improve, as well as becoming discerning about feedback and better ways of applying it to…

    • 1233 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Universal Design Approach

    • 981 Words
    • 4 Pages

    A commonly used example is with the “think-pair-share” model. As students think of their own answers, discuss their thoughts with a partner, and then share with the collective group it allows them to decrease pressure while increasing risk-taking and confidence (Dolmage, 2015). Further, allowing students to respond to the lesson can enhance engagement while also demonstrating what has been retained. This also displays to the students that the teacher is invested in them through the interactive nature. Developing lessons that allow students to engage and interact with both their peers and their educator will enhance their learning experience.…

    • 981 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    98). This transference of responsibility, is achieved by gradually building on student’s confidence and competence on a task, through guiding the student through the task, starting with explicit instruction, then gradually removing the level of assistance to increase the student’s independence (Fox-Turnbull & Snape 2011, p. 46). Scaffolding in education, is achieved through the use of modelling and language, such as questioning, feedback, direct instruction, discussion, and demonstration, to promote a higher level of thinking in students (Woolfolk & Margetts 2016, p. 98). As seen by ‘Observation 2’ and ‘Observation 3’, scaffolding in the classroom can be executed by a teacher or peers, if they are more knowledgeable than the student about a particular subject. Additionally, the use of modelling and language were both applied by the more knowledgeable other/s in ‘Observation 2 & 3’to scaffold the student’s learning.…

    • 925 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Data lets me learn strengthens and weaknesses of the students. Viewing past and present records of students helps me to understand the whole child. When I review data and records of students, it enables me to structure lessons based on my student’ capabilities. As a teacher leader I use the skills students are strong at doing well to remediate them in low performing areas. My journey as a teacher leader has guided me to consider different approaches…

    • 1554 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    After establishing a purpose to the lesson, the think-aloud process accompanies modeling the task or skill to be learned. It allows the teacher to model, through verbalizations, the appropriate pattern of thinking in order to give students an example or strategy of a cognitive process to emulate. These verbalizations provide a narrative for the learner to copy or follow. During a reading lesson, Fisher and Frey (2014) recommend projecting a short passage as a visual for all to see as well as providing each student with a copy of the passage so each person has access to the text. The teacher reads aloud and pauses to interject their thinking process using the “first person to describe how to make decisions, implement skills, activate problem-solving approaches and evaluate whether success has been achieved” (Fisher & Frey, 2014, pp.…

    • 1609 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays