Liberttarianism Argumentative Analysis

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Libertarianism looks to the individual to make his or her own decisions about freedom. Ultimately, this perspective is one of extremism, as supporters allow any form of exchange so long as voluntary consent is freely given. In issue #3 of Luke Cage: Hero for Hire, this viewpoint is both exemplified and challenged through Cage’s pursuit of his hero for hire business. In alignment with libertarian perspective, Cage believes it is within his freedom to offer the benefits of his powers to others for a price through market exchange. Dr. Burstein disagrees with the notion of hiring Cage to be a hero, believing it goes against Burstein’s perception of what defines a proper conscience. Rather than looking toward Cage’s sense of freedom, Burstein focuses …show more content…
‘Cept you’re always gonna be peerin’ over my shoulder…Like a parole officer!” (Luke Cage #3) in response to Burstein. His choice of language here points to his feelings toward libertarianism. To him, freedom is the ability to exercise free will over his body, and without such ability he is not technically “free”, but rather heeding to the decisions of others, in particular Burstein. Because Cage would be working under Burstein’s morals and decisions, he would lose ownership of himself. The language in this panel references the earlier pages in which Cage made the reluctant decision to undergo body modification as a hopes of receiving parole. The word “parole officer” here is used to highlight the similarity between being forced to abide by a parole officer’s demands and by Burstein’s requests. Through this, the issue makes a point to suggest that both situations limit Cage’s freedom. For Cage, he was falsely imprisoned by society for a crime he had not committed, thus giving him no reason to feel the need to give back freedom to said society. By becoming a hero for hire, Cage is looking to establish his definition of self and regaining the power and ownership of his body that had previously been taken from him. In addition, this conversation takes place within the confines of Burstein’s office. When Cage finally leaves and refuses a “parole officer”, he exits the room and thusly Burstein’s space that he controls. Once out of the office, Cage is no longer restricted by Burstein’s presence. This juxtaposition is similar to the panel showing Cage leaving his prison cell, an act which also gives him a sense of

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