Lab Analysis: Finding The Mass Of Sodium Bicarbonate

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After processing the data to find the mass of sodium bicarbonate as well as calculating the percent errors, standard deviation and etcetera, many trends and discussion topics arose and the data produced had small calculations. The percent error showed scattered results. When looking at the table, the percent errors can go from 7.05% to 200% and the reason for the extremely high percents were systematic errors made while measuring vinegar or other measurements. Two of the three deformities in measurements come consecutively after each other: trial 6 and 7. Although three of the percent errors show the high percent, most stayed below 20% which is still not sufficive but it represents a trend in percent errors. In contrast, the standard deviation …show more content…
For example, measuring the vinegar and tablet and the final addition of the two were different to other measured values therefore most of the error in this trend comes from measuring items. because it is obvious that systematic error is mainly present, the problems can be fixed through changing the procedure. Consequently, the procedure used for this lab unfortunately did not include a safety net for systematic errors therefore if the measurements of the tablet and the vinegar were more precisely analyzed before assuming that the measurement was sufficient, than the deformed data would dramastically fixed. However, not all of the error can be accredited to systematic while there is still random that most likely exist in possibly missing numbers within the small numbers thereby accounting for a small number of error within this situation. As said above, two of the three unique measurements were consecutively 6 and 7 therefore it is most likely possible that while measuring for vinegar the mistake was made again after trial 6 in trial …show more content…
However when correcting the average of the experimental data because of reasons said above using the more accurate data, the average equals: 1.7905 grams of sodium bicarbonate. This is obviously a much better calculated average than before thus contributing significantly to the error. However this number does represent the closest possible accepted value therefore the deformed values can be manipulated to a better measurement because of the known systematic mistake of measuring the vinegar. Therefore, if the measurements of trial 6 and 7 are changed from 37.195 and 37.725 to 36.195 and 36.725, the average experimental value should be closer to the accepted because of the calibration effect of changing the raw data. With the new calculated average of 1.843 grams, the experimental value becomes closer than before. Other than the reasons for error stated above and the corrections made by these error, different external factors played a role on the data. One important factor could have been the impurity of the given material of the

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