Contrast Between Women In Sense And Sensibility By Jane Austen

1016 Words 5 Pages
Jane Austen uses Elizabeth’s wit, aptitude, and humor to show the contrast between her and Women in the Regency era, It was important for Jane Austen to do this because the literary world had never seen something like this before. Austen writes Elizabeth as a character who is cunning and smart. “There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.” She possesses beliefs that were not commonly seen in the classic woman, of the time period, who epitomized a gentle passivity.. For example, Elizabeth values education and personality when looking for a suitor which is different than the character of, say, Charlotte, who looks for fortune and fame in …show more content…
This line completely goes against Austen’s views and this is known because Austen writes her ideas of society as Elizabeth’s character. For example at It was good idea to do this because it helps emphasize the ideas of powerful women by putting it against the complete opposite idea. Austen uses the ideas of Hyperbole to help show their characters choices and how vastly different they are. This is not the only time we see this in Austen’s work. In Sense and Sensibility Austen uses the same literary devices that can be seen here. Elizabeth can also speak sarcastically and “out of turn”, which is another thing that wasn’t common back then. Her smart remarks help strengthen her character’s views and beliefs. In the book, whilst talking to Darcy, Elizabeth asks him if he has any idea of what an accomplished woman is. He replies with stereotypes of the time that they should know how to sing dance, and draw, that they should good manners and have good posture. These remarks come off as offensive to Elizabeth. She responds with, “I am no longer surprised at your knowing only six accomplished women. I rather wonder now at your knowing any.” (Austen …show more content…
Elizabeth is the only character who has views like this and it makes her sort of an outcast. Austen writes the other women in this book sort of shallow and naive. For example, Charlotte Lucas says that, “‘I am not romantic, you know. I never was. I ask only a comfortable home; and considering Mr. Collins’s character, connections, and situation in life, I am convinced that my chance of happiness with him is as fair as most people can boast on entering the marriage state’” (Austen 120). Charlotte has the belief that she should marry for a comfortable home and money, she is not concerned necessarily about Mr. Collins character. This is a great example of a foil that Austen writes. Although the two are best friends they both have completely different ideas about marriage. It is very smart because it enhances the ideas of Elizabeth and how she doesn’t think there should be a time limit on who she has to marry. Charlotte’s ideas are opposed to Elizabeth’s ideas. In this situation Elizabeth is explaining to Darcy why she refused his

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