Lady Chaeterine Pride And Prejudice Analysis

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As the representation of women 's role in this time of era expands throughout the story, the reader learns about the social capabilities of women, and the various expectations for women and marriage. This first sentence of Pride and Prejudice, not only talks about men in want of a wife, but it infers that since women don’t have the capabilities of possessing a fortune, women have to be in need of a man with a good fortune. When the Bennet family was discussing the matter that Mr. Bingley would be assisting the party they were going to attend, Mrs. Bennet explained, 'If I can but see one of my daughters happily settled at Netherfield..." and …"all the others equally well married, I shall have nothing to wish for. ' '
2. Although the title "First
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Even if the suspense from Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth is taken away. 9. Lady Catherine is portrayed as someone who cannot stand anyone to be against her. Lady Chaterine 's character does not develop throughout the story, but her prideful and vulgar manners are really visible in the story, specially when she came all the way from her estate to tell Elizabeth that, by marrying Darcy, she would be "polluting the shades of Pemberley". This is ironic, because she has to approve the union between Darcy and Elizabeth, which in terms of good and evil, this satisfies the readers since the audience always wants to see love triumph over everything. One can contemplate how her impertinence and anger against Elizabeth 's engagement makes Mr. Darcy realize about how good Elizabeth is, and the irony is captured at the end of the story because Lady Catherine is, indirectly, a reason why Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth are together. 10. Jane Austen was never married, although in her young life she was attached to a man, but was against their families ' wishes for them to marry. She was once proposed by a man who had all the means of marrying her, she turned him down, because she lacked love for him. It is very noticeable that Jane lived as an independent spirit, and that most of the main characters in her stories are very independent-minded and witty. For people nowadays, marrying for love is the normal constant, very different as to how society thought about marriage in Pride and Prejudice. A personal opinion, would be that Jane wanted to draw a line in the sand and mark a point between love and chasteness, that a person can have one without the other, even though that society was probably completely against that way of thinking. Austen probably introduced this view by not involving any sense of passion throughout the

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