The Limitation Of Society In Jane Austen's Pride And Prejudice

1756 Words 8 Pages
Pride and Prejudice is a remarkable novel written by Jane Austen that follows the story of how two opposite characters, William Darcy and Elizabeth Bennett, unite despite their differences. The novel has gained a lot of recognition and success that many adaptations were made such as The Lizzie Bennet Diaries created by Hank Green and Bernie Su which also follows the same storyline, but in the form of vlogs uploaded on YouTube, a huge video-sharing website. However, Pride and Prejudice reflect a traditional and conventional society while The Lizzie Bennet Diaries presents a much more realistic and modern world of today’s society. A study of these two works in this regard reveals some really significant differences about the limitations of society …show more content…
The only way to be financially supported was to marry a wealthy man: “it is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife” (Austen 43). Also, the mother of the Bennet family, Mrs. Bennet, is eagerly desperate to have her daughters married: “A single man of large fortune; four or five thousand a year. What a fine thing for our girls!” (Austen 44). This statement shows that marriage leads to financial security. As long as there is money involve, that is what all that matters at that time. People marry for the sake of protection and beneficence, but not for the sake of love itself. Like Charlotte, she marries Mr. Collins because she believes that her quality of life will enhance as Mr. Collins is able to support her needs. And this is exactly what Jane Austen depicts the society in the past; there wasn’t really a choice in life. It’s either you marry and live a better life or wait for love and struggle with debt. In Susan Morgan’s study of the novel (1975), “Pride and Prejudice explores the special question of the meaning of freedom, given the premise which Jane Austen assumes throughout her fiction, that the relation between a character and public reality is at once problematic and necessary” (2). We see this through Elizabeth’s characterization. She uses her wit and intelligence which is seen as being genuine, someone who is not superficial. …show more content…
In fact, the creators emphasize more on career over marriage as oppose in Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. Sherry (1979) suggests that Darcy represents social restraints imposing upon individual freedom (10). This refers to social class. He is first seen as reserved, cold, and antisocial as if he is uninterested to converse with people below his rank. This suggests the importance of social class in society when Lady Catherine refuses to accept that Mr. Darcy chose Elizabeth: “My daughter and my nephew are formed for each other. They are descended on the maternal side, from the same noble line; and, on the father’s, from respectable, honourable, and ancient, though untitled families” (Austen 357). They associate love with social class and wealth where they should be following the principles of their own values. Whereas in today’s society, our personal lives are not managed by our parents, but what our heart tells us. In the series, it follows the importance of happiness and self: “All this time, I haven’t been working on my stuff. I’ve been working on yours [Lizzie]” (LBD: Friends Forever 42). This argument between Charlotte and Lizzie suggest that marriage is no business. It is not as necessary as it is emphasize in Austen’s novel. Another example is Jane’s pursuing her fashion career over Bing Lee. Early in the narrative Lizzie tells the viewers, “It frustrates our mom to no end that

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