Do We Acquire Knowledge: Subjective Or Objective Knowledge?

Improved Essays
Introduction:
I shall argue that the knowledge that we all acquire as humans is not only subjective, but does involve objective thought. Some have argued that it is not possible to have objective reality because what we learn passes our senses and neurochemistry, making the way that we acquire knowledge a subjective process. I will argue that objectivity is not just possible but vital to how we treat each others, how we work to understand people, and especially ourselves. I believe that subjective knowledge is our ability to sift through the objective knowledge we obtain and decide how to apply that knowledge to every day decisions within our context.

Statement of ethical issue intended to solve:
The ethical issue that is posed when we
…show more content…
To be subjective, one employs a more personal, passionate, and practical process to gather knowledge. One could logically see that both theories of knowledge can be utilized in making decisions on truth one would like to hold or believe in. The world is always an issue of two sorts, the way in which it appears to us and the way in which it really is. It is in this quest for truth that we employ both subjective and objective knowledge. If it were merely subjective knowledge that we employed there would always be a revolving circle of conflict about what decisions were just.

Evaluation of argument:
It is my view that if we rely on subjective position only it would not hold up that it can’t be deployed in support of itself. Merely asking the question if one can be objective or not suggest that they can. Who would even care in searching for the truth if someone could be objective if it has not occurred at some point before? Otherwise, we are all just blabbering idiots, going on and on about our own experiences and agendas. We should all strive for objective knowledge. It’s the only knowledge that is untainted by prejudice, preconceptions, or bias and asserts to provide what is good to us

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    However one must first identify their beliefs and question them. Questioning one owns beliefs help us learn the flaws within ourselves. As independent thinking individuals, one of our flaws is that each one of us think our beliefs are correct. This leads to multiple truths but by supporting these truths with evidence can help eliminate some of those "truths". Through experiences, we learn about ourselves and of others creating awareness which can lead to "truth".…

    • 1006 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Firth implies that we are sometimes blinded by our feelings and this can affect the judgement of an Ideal Observer, being dispassionate prevents that. An Ideal Observer must also be consistent with their reactions which I disagree with as this is trying to prove Firth’s idea of an Ideal Observer being an absolutist. An Ideal Observer as I mentioned must be subjectivist depending on different situations, moral judgements will not be consistent. For example, everyone will agree that stealing is bad however an absolutist…

    • 2027 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Moving towards greater objectivity is usually the aim to understanding things better since it gets us to how something actually is aside from how each person’s perspective perceives it. But, because this passage is pertaining to the subjective nature of experience, greater objectivity does, according to Nagel, us no good. He says, “that concerns the same thing” to prove his point. When we focus one one phenomenon and how we understand it, no matter how objective our viewpoints become, the phenomenon can still only be understood in the same manner as when we began discerning it. This is because the subjective nature is in the thing itself, thus we must become the entity…

    • 1282 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The ways groups of people seek knowledge are dependent on views of how they judge information. Al-Ghazzali starts his text with his realization that all of his knowledge could be wrong and uncertain and that there is error with thinking everything you know to be true is uncertain. To begin searching for true knowledge you have to convince yourself that you seek not just knowledge, but the true meaning of knowledge (Page 3). There are parts of knowledge that you don’t know, therefore…

    • 540 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    One cannot exist without the other as to a certain degree, emotion will always have reign over reason in the form of biases; These biases fabricate the ambiguity that is discerned from the relationship between reason and emotion within both bodies of shared and personal knowledge. In order to discern truth, one must first glean information, which reason and emotion then place credence behind this information to deem it as facts. These facts then are converted into personal and communal bodies of knowledge so that individuals and groups discern the value of truth. “Why Facts Don’t Change Our Minds” by Elizabeth Kolbert, argues this relationship and demonstrates that to a large extent, emotion is integral in the formulation of reason as one cannot occur without the…

    • 807 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The struggle between certainty and doubt is the ultimate choice and feeling you have on a decision, yourself, or others. The choice is not so finite; it could lie anywhere in between the two. The perspectives of William Lyon Phelps and Bertrand Russell are antithetical to each other, but their views are on differing topics as well. Phelps implies that you must have certainty in yourself in order to complete and defeat any task in the way. On the other hand, Russell mentions that the views or opinion you encounter should never be completely accepted and a minute amount of doubt shall always be infused with your thoughts.…

    • 649 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Examples Of Contextualism

    • 1047 Words
    • 5 Pages

    In Ethics Seminar, the question what makes a person a person came up, and focused on what makes a person a person versus something like a chair. Contextualism supports the idea that living things are self aware because they base their judgements or context. While the other theories can also help to answer this question, contextualism stands out. To add to this, the more experience and knowledge a person requires, the more using contexts and contextualism is oblivious to the person. According to the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, “The typical EC view has it that as the stakes rise or the skeptical doubts become more serious, the contextual standard gets more demanding.…

    • 1047 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Reason Behind Human Action

    • 1047 Words
    • 4 Pages

    How do we achieve the answer? The only thing certain is that, we can only achieve an answer to these questions using our beliefs. We should use the information that we discover about ourselves, our world, others, and even God to define our identity; sometimes, these information and beliefs that do not even agree with each other. More often than not, since people vary from each other, the beliefs that we have also vary. Before discussing the reason behind human…

    • 1047 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Charlotte Kang PHIL 110 Paper 1 Option 2: Foundationalist response to infinite regress argument for scepticism Sceptical arguments are designed to show that we lack any knowledge whatsoever. Such arguments have informed views about what knowledge is and whether we have any in the first place, by establishing the conditions that any acceptable knowledge claim must meet. This essay addresses the idea of radical, or global scepticism: that every statement is doubtful, and that information and theories are never certain or justified. Thus, claims for truth and knowledge about the real world depends on the defeat of scepticism. This essay discusses a particular argument for global scepticism – the infinite regress argument.…

    • 1084 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Can Knowledge Be Justified

    • 1321 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The justified, true, belief theory states that in order for X to know P, P must be true, X must believe in P, and X must be very justified in their belief of P. However, the Gettier example shows that X can be justified in their belief for P, and P happens to be true, yet X still does not know P. The point of the Gettier example was not to show that humans do not know anything. It was suppose to demonstrate that no matter how many different conditions are added to the definition of knowledge, there will always be a counterexample. The definition of knowledge is always a work in…

    • 1321 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays

Related Topics