Importance Of Children's Perspective In Learning And Development

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It is important educators include children’s perspectives in their assessment of each child’s learning and development. This is shown through a sociocultural approach, suggesting learning and development enhances within social interactions who can guide and support children’s learning. Children construct their own knowledge, but in partnership with others who share understanding, the closer and more reciprocal relationships are has a greater influence on children’s understandings. For children to express their views and develop agency they need sufficient support and guidance from people who know how to communicate and listen to children efficiently (Clark, 2010). Children are competent, responsible agents who contribute to their own learning …show more content…
An example shown in Clark (2010) is of an Indian family who were selling oranges at a market. A European woman wanted to purchase some of the fruit and asked the elderly women ‘how much?’ (Clark, 2010). She anxiously called her five year old grandson over who told the European women ‘seven and ten rupees’. This example shows a child who understood English more advance than his grandmother. It shows the importance of educators including children’s perspectives within their learning and development. Just because this child is younger does not necessarily mean they are not advance enough to understand, age does not diminish children’s agency or rights (Clark, 2010). Educators need to ensure children’s perspectives are included and they are not making assumptions as to what they believe to be age appropriate. As educators we need to reconsider what we know to be ‘normal’ development, ensuring we allow children to tell their stories. Allowing all children to tell their own stories shows respect to their citizenship, providing information to make educators more effective supporters (Smith, …show more content…
New Zealand signed this document which shows we are a country who values the childhood study approach (United Nations, 1989). Te Whāriki and its strands and principles are closely related to the views woven throughout the United Nations document (Ministry of Education, 1996). Both the United Nations document and our New Zealand curriculum Te Whāriki strongly influence the importance of including the ‘child’s voice’ within their early childhood learning and development (Ministry of Education, 1996). Te Whāriki concerns with well-being and wholeness of children and recognises children as their own person not assumptions of educators or adults. United Nations states in article 12 that children are “capable of forming his or her own views the right to express those vies freely in all matters affecting the child” (United Nations, 1989, p.5). Childhood studies approach is sociocultural but mainly emphasises on children’s rights, the above quote shows that children have the right to express their own views. Educators need to think about children’s world before assuming they know what is right for them or what they believe to be age appropriate. United Nations (1989) acknowledges the importance of recognising and celebrating children’s culture and values. As stated in United Nations “parties shell respect the right of the child to freedom of thought, conscience and

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