Identity And Self Concept Essay

1469 Words 6 Pages
The Development of Identity and Self-Concept When individuals look into a mirror, there is much more looking back besides just physical characteristics. As complex organisms, with high levels of thinking, feeling, and social functioning, humans have both unique, inherent traits, as well as unique life experiences. Both of these areas mold together into the development of one’s identity and self-concept. At no other time is the formulations of identity and self-concept more important than during the integral years from middle-childhood through early adolescence. Erikson (as cited in Crocetti, Rubini, Luyckx, & Meeus, 2008) stated, “the fundamental developmental task that individual face during adolescence is defining their identity,” (p. 983). …show more content…
Judith Bessant (2008) discussed developing brain chemistry when she stated, “This research indicates that, contrary to what we previously thought, our brains do not finish developing at an early age; rather, growth continues until our early to mid-twenties. Moreover, this development takes place in the frontal lobe cortex of all young people.” (p. 350). Giedd et al (as cited in Bessant, 2008), emphasized that, “frontal lobes help people do ‘the right thing’ and are one of the last areas of the brain to reach a stable ‘grown-up’ state. This it is said tells us why young people are irresponsible and are unreasonable,” (p. 350). The actual size of this populations’ brains, and process in development of the frontal lobes, can have a huge impact on self-concept and identity development. They may make decisions, without the ability to rationalize outcomes, that can have a profound effect on the way others see them, thus ultimately shaping their own …show more content…
Utilizing a structural approach, a counselor can observe various levels of interaction within the family dynamic. Melito (1988) stated that, “From this perspective, a full understanding of individual and family requires analysis of each level or context within which the individual operates—intrapsychic, interpersonal, and transactional—and of the interrelationships of these levels,” (p. 350). By incorporating this theoretical method with the entire family, a counselor can address multiple areas of concern in regard to the development of the child’s self-concept and identity. Family education can also be promoted to increase developmental

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