Humanistic Psychoanalysis

Improved Essays
1. Psychoanalysis and its variants:
• Psychoanalysis is recognizable through the silence or very limited comments on the part of the therapist; it is mainly the client talking. The talking can also be referred to as free expression (Feltham, 1995)
• The psychoanalyst allows the client sufficient time and space for self-discovery, so as to find answer to his or her problems, within himself/herself.
• One of the major issues throughout all psychoanalysis therapies and its variants is transference. According to Feltham (1995) it is the patients’ unconscious distortion of perception of emotional claim on the analyst, who may be regarded as an important person in the client’s life.
• In psychoanalysis the therapist prefers the client to lie down
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Humanist Therapies
• ‘The core condition of unconditional positive regard, empathy and genuineness first promoted by Carl Rogers are often used as the fundamentals of skills training for counsellors of the Humanistic therapies, the training would also include the trainees’ own openness to the inner and inter personal experience (Feltham, 1995).”
• According to Feltham (1995) the concept of energy, growth, potential, process, self-actualization, creativity, authenticity, real self-feelings and peak experiences, are those which make up humanistic therapy generally, and what works against them is anything from traumatic intra-uterine and birth experiences, subtle and gross emotional abuse by parents, and other oppressive cultural forces including patriarchy, racism, homophobia, intellectualization and internalization of parental and cultural messages which leads to inhibitors to personal growth (Feltham, 1995).
• The main aim of the therapy is to help people go back into early, traumatized state of mind and body, identified by dramatic crying, wailing, shouting and convulsion like movements. (Feltham,
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• According to Feltham (1995) people centered therapy has an in-build anti-authoritarian value system; only the individual knows what she or he needs and no one else has any right to dictate to the individual.
• It is alleged that person centered therapies are only good for providing good listening skills, self-awareness and therapeutic alliance but not much else.
• It is said that most client only need to be heard.
• Humanistic therapies are criticized for not being helpful to those who are very depressed.
• The criticism has also been put that this approach is naïve in relation to socio political issues.
• It is criticized for lack of assistance because sometimes clients need information that a counsellor can provide and the person centered approach does not provide atmosphere sharing of information,especially during the therapy session, because the counsellor is avoiding influencing the

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