Carl Rogers Theories Of Personality Analysis

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Carl Rogers once said, “In my early professional years I was asking the question: How can I treat, or cure, or change this person? Now I would phrase the question in this way: How can I provide a relationship which this person may use for his own personal growth?” (Carl Rogers Quotes 2018). Humans have a unique way of understanding oneself and rationalizing the way they are. We set goals for our future selves and are aware of our actions and the consequences of those actions. This is one of the traits that makes us human as opposed to any other species on earth. Our brains are developed enough to cognitively understand and make decisions to act or feel a certain way. It is plausible to believe that the choices and decision we make even as …show more content…
He also believed that humans had an unconscious that we suppress and affects rational decision making. Finally, Freud believed that humans had instincts that were given at birth (Summary of Freud’s Basic Ideas 2014). Unlike Freud, Carl Rogers’s theory of personality evolved out of work as a clinical psychologist and developed as a person-centered therapy. This is that the person was aware of his actions and that the person could understand his actions. Rogers key points were that the essentiality of success in life depends upon three factors; recognition of positive potential and capability of the person, self-consciousness of the person with identification of the inner self with positive feelings, and the recognition of the person with his potential to transform his life with attainment of success by following a true path in life with recognition of efforts in every situation. He also believed in positive actions to control oneself instead of negative. According to an article entitled, “An Analysis of Carl Rogers' Theory of Personality”, Pescitelli states, “When significant others in the person's world (usually parents) provide positive regard that is conditional, rather than unconditional, the person introjects the desired values, making them his/her own, and acquires "conditions of worth". (Pescitelli …show more content…
This person centered therapy or client-centered therapy allows for the person to derive their own course of action in therapy. While Rogers sees the common human condition as one of incongruence between self and experience, this does not minimize his ultimate belief in the autonomy of human beings. Rogers sees the human being as: "capable of evaluating the outer and inner situation, understanding herself in its context, making constructive choices as to the next steps in life, and acting on those choices" (Pescitelli 1996). This most closely resembles free will. “While humans behave rationally, Rogers maintains that: ‘The tragedy for most of us is that our defenses keep us from being aware of this rationality so that we are consciously moving in one direction, while organismical we are moving in another.’” (Pescitelli 1996). This is where his views differ from Freud in that instead of believing that man is inherently bad, Rogers believed that man is capable of understanding one's situation and changing

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