Gender Stereotypes In Laura Mulvey's 'Ramona Flowers'

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The debatable manic pixie dream girl, Ramona Flowers, is a main character from the comic series, Scott Pilgrim, and she simultaneously breaks and enforces typical gender stereotypes. In the comic series her sex is female, but her actions and clothing occasionally deviate from this. When considering her character from the beginning of the series to the end, she develops immensely and becomes a unique character with substance. In general, Ramona is a strong female character who has relatable issues, makes mistakes, and is a young 24-year-old trying to find herself after being wronged by many men in her life. Physically speaking, Ramona often dresses in feminine clothes, but this is not very strict, being that her style would be considerably …show more content…
There are times throughout the series where Ramona is only wearing underwear3, and always at these times her body is specifically highlighted erotically, though she does appear to be modest by covering herself. One example would be in the first volume, where the two undress. Ramona’s body seems to be specifically highlighted in these moments, her face being absent to the reader. Additionally, there are multiple scenes where Ramona’s buttocks is shown and she is completely unaware of the audience seeing this2, creating what Mulvey would call a voyeuristic character. However, the genre of the comic is somewhat slice-of-life, and the scenes are reminiscent of a typical situation where couples are only in underwear together, so this could justify the images. Ultimately, the problem lies with how Ramona’s body is heavily highlighted in these scenes where she is less clothed, making her body more important than her actual …show more content…
The premise of the comic is for Scott to fight her evil exes to ultimately win the right to date her, which is not completely what happens but a general theme that the comic starts with. Immediately, we are well aware that Ramona has had multiple relationships, has had sex, and has been with a girl before, since “exes” includes both biological genders. Despite having multiple partners, Ramona is not deemed as impure by Scott because of her sexual history or made to seem like a tramp. Additionally, when the two first are intimate with each other, there is a great scene involving sexual consent. Scott seems to be nervous or uncomfortable about having sex with Ramona, she recognizes this and changes her mind, saying “I don’t want to have sex with you, Pilgrim. Not right now,” and Scott agrees with this response (Vol. 1, 104). Generally, sex in the series is not pornographic nor is it rape, but it instead is something pleasantly shared between couples. Furthermore, sex isn’t the only use for women, and I find this extremely noteworthy. One critique in regards to Ramona’s sexuality involves her romance with another girl, Roxy. Though it is nice to have some representation of bisexuality and a deviation from heterosexuality in general, something the comic does often with its characters, the relationship becomes meaningless when objectified by men. For example, when Scott realizes the relationship

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