Extraversion Leadership

1225 Words 5 Pages
When one visualises an effective leader, the image is of a motivated, captivating individual who challenges situations, produces visions of the future and inspires followers to achieve. Leadership in part is largely about the reciprocal relationship between a leader and their alertness to the positive or negative reactions of followers (Hollander, 1978, p.2). Leaders can emerge from within a group as well as by formal appointment, additionally the same leader can succeed in one context yet fail in another (Leavy & Wilson, 1994). Organisations need successful leaders in order to achieve optimal effectiveness and theories are used to stress the value of leadership, but more importantly help to reveal the implications of exactly what features …show more content…
It is one of the Big-Five personality traits which outlines the most salient characteristics of personality (Goldberg, 1992). Extraverts tend to be gregarious, assertive and happy (Robbins & Judge, 2017, p.180) making them skilful in handing social situations. The reason why extraversion is a key feature important for an effective leader is because extraverts establish vision, motivate and inspire followers, thus creating a rich atmosphere. Evidence supports extraversion being the best predictor of an effective leader, for example the outcome of Judge et al’s (2002) personality meta-analysis indicates that extraversion was the most “consistent correlate of leadership across study settings and leadership criteria” (Judge et al, 2002, p.765). This is because extraversion had an estimated corrected correlation of = .31 making it the strongest correlate of leadership out of all the Big-Five personality traits. It is however, interesting to note that the findings also revealed that extraversion is more likely to facilitate leader emergence than leader effectiveness which emphasises the importance of subordinates’ …show more content…
Here, it is important to note how contrasting research suggests that in an unpredictable context it is actually introverts who make more effective leaders because they “listen and show greater receptivity” (Grant, 2010, p.1). This alternative viewpoint exposes the differences of situational contexts and coincides with the downside of extraversion being impulsivity and engaging in risky behaviour (Robbins & Judge, 2017, p.181). Nonetheless, the research and general consensus suggests that extraversion is a key predictor of effective leadership because it helps to establish vision and engage followers. Extraversion is linked to personal power which is another important feature for effective leadership as they both generate commitment from followers which helps to improve

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