Explain The Importance Of Early Identification Of Speech, Language And Communication Analysis

Improved Essays
Children with a learning or physical disability may be subjected to prejudice or disability may become subjected to prejudice or discrimination as they are treated and cared for differently to other pupils in school, self-confidence can be affected by bullying or teasing which can lead to disruption in learning and affect their social development. Their communication skills may be minimal so interacting with others can be proved difficult, this can result in slower development in multiple areas. Children with dyslexia may struggle with varied aspects of schooling, this may cause the child to become frustrated, have behavioural problems and develop a dislike for school, left undetected dyslexia can have a profound affect on the child's development …show more content…
Identifying any speech, language and communication delays means the pupil can receive the appropriate type of support in future schooling and work towards improving any difficulties. Early intervention allows us to identify the problem that would put a child at a disadvantage and to decide what helps improve their communication and language which aides progressive development. Maximising care with speech and language barriers greatly improves the chances of the child increasing physical and academic skills also.
Late recognition can have a detrimental affect later in development which can cause behavioural problems, learning delays and deferred spellings and reading. The pupil may find it difficult to engage in particular activities leaving the individual feeling frustrated and isolated.
It is the role of the professional to know and understand children's learning and development in order to notice any early signs and therefore be able to provide suitable activities and appropriate academic work to encourage learning and development at a stress free pace for the

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Clancy Blair, a developmental psychologist, notes that the area of the brain that controls cognitive function and the area associated with emotional stimulation have an influence on one another, which means that strong emotions will affect the child’s ability to process information (Blair, 2009). Cognitive functions are key skills that a student needs to succeed in school, such as the ability to focus, to pay attention, and to solve problems. Without the enforcement of emotional regulation in a child’s life, the child will be more likely to fall behind in his or her education. The child’s ability to pay attention and focus will be dictated by his or her mood, and this inconsistency will not provide a good platform to learn and process information. Just as well, if the child has not been taught to control his or her emotions well, he or she will have difficulty working with other students and will not do well in projects associated with teamwork.…

    • 804 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Coping With Ebd

    • 1129 Words
    • 5 Pages

    When working with Emotional Behavioral Disorders certain children will exhibit usual behaviors, fearfulness and not paying attention in the classroom setting. In order to encourage a child with EBD in the class certain accommodations will need to be made. For example: children with Emotional Behavioral Disorders benefit from a visual schedule, daily board, a schedule with a chart etc. Children who suffer from EBD will also most likely have outbursts, be upset, and or not follow expectations. To help a child cope better with EBD it will require some change and patience.…

    • 1129 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Effective teachers model the language skills they expect from their students. Word choice, grammar, and non-verbal messages can support or detract from effective communication. Non-verbal messages can be just as important as verbal communication with students. Communication in the classroom can result in positive actions, but can also become less effective based off a variety of barriers. These barriers can include the communication not being stated clearly, if the room is too noisy, or the students may be unsure of the word choice the teacher has chosen to use.…

    • 1067 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Sometimes children make mistakes like we do but, it is important that we take the time to properly handle the situation before labeling the child. Sarah also states that misbehavior implies that the child has the emotional and social tools to deal with complex conflicts, but mistaken behavior implies that children are still learning. With that being said, mistaken behavior can come out as many things like fighting for toys, having tantrums, or being aggressive. When a child takes toys away from another child it is not that he is misbehaving it may be that he hasn't been expose to sharing and is having a difficult time understanding that other children want to play with that toy as well. When we see children have tantrums we often think the worst of them like how rude is he, how…

    • 2036 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In particular these children may experience having a reduced self-esteem and have low expectations for themselves. Docking (2002) supports this idea by explaining that children gain high self-esteem when they have successfully met a challenge. This can cause children to have unrealistic expectations and the pressures of living up to a high expectation. Children can be regarded as disruptive when they do not match up to school standards and expectations. Varma (1993) suggests that ‘disruptions occur when a child does not observe the rules that were in force at any given moment.’ This is supported by Clarke and Murray (1995) who explored the reasons to why some children displayed challenging behaviour.…

    • 1586 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    If we don’t encourage the children to be proud of their culture and background while introducing to them the new culture, they will be left feeling lost and inferior. They feel unsure of who they are until they feel safe to claim their identity. Teachers need to understand other cultures and students need to feel valued and accepted. As you can see, teachers are expected to change classroom practices to support the learning of struggling students. The safe environment that would nurture the children during a difficult time of uncertainty while bridging the gap between old and new cultures, and that will make a difference in student learning.…

    • 835 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In fact, the problem is the emphasis on testing and the number of tests children need to complete. But research suggests that testing with lower stakes can benefit the child’s learning. This means the use of self-testing, where the child can monitor their own performance, or things such as non-graded tests, where the child’s school future doesn’t hang in the balance of performing in the test. Tests work because they boost the ability to self-reflect. The kid is able to see how he or she is doing and identify the areas they need to work harder in.…

    • 824 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Self Regulation

    • 1218 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Children experience better emotional regulation when they replace the feelings of not being good enough with the feeling of being ready to try one more time a certain activity. Ida Rose Florez asserts that: ''Regulating anxiety and thinking helps children persist in challenging activities, which increases their opportunities to practice the skills required for an activity. Conversely, when children regulate uncomfortable emotions, they can relax and focus on learning cognitive skills.'' To help this process, teachers should help students feel secure and content in the class by encouraging them and by allowing them to become independent. In order to do that, the teacher must prepare beforehand and have some class routines.…

    • 1218 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Numeracy In Education

    • 825 Words
    • 4 Pages

    If people have limited key skills or fear change, they may lack confidence and/or motivation. By having open communication, teachers are in a position to reassure learners and allay any concerns, helping learners to feel more positive about their learning experience. There are practical barriers affecting access to learning e.g. childcare responsibilities that affects learners’ attendance. It requires teachers to be flexible regarding attendance and punctuality policies so as not to deter learners.…

    • 825 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    (2012) point out; children who display poor emotion regulation, are withdrawn or exhibit academic disengagement in the classroom are at risk of school difficulty. However, if educators look beyond the behaviours displayed by the child to take into account the whole child using Bronfenbrenner’s conceptual framework (Powell & Tod, 2004), they will gain a better understanding of possible underlying issues that may be triggering the inappropriate or challenging behaviour (Doherty & Hughes, 2009). For instance, when a child is having trouble regulating their emotions they may display aggressive behaviour such as angry outbursts or tantrums. Florez (2011) asserts that sociocultural theory would consider the behaviour a result of the child being an only child at home. Hence, the parents never acquainting the child with the concept of sharing in the home environment; limiting the child’s social experiences and in turn, influencing the child’s behaviour in the classroom environment (Doherty & Hughes, 2009; Nolan & Raban, 2015).…

    • 1161 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays