Evolutionary Theodicy: The Trinitarian Idea Of Creation

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Introduction According to the Christian doctrine of creatio ex nihilo, creation is ontologically dependent on its Creator. This means that “God, in creating the universe, was not constrained by the limitations of the already existing stuff from which the universe was to be fashioned, but was free to bring into existence a universe in which the divine will was recognizably embodied and enacted” In these two tenets, it is affirmed that God was not forced by any inner or outer necessities to create the universe, but freely brought into existence the universe “out of love for creatures that are other than God.” However, in the eyes of contemporary scientists, the cosmos as a whole and the evolution of the biosphere of our planet …show more content…
Then, before presenting my Trinitarian idea of evolution, I discuss the method I use in this paper and the core contents of evolutionary biology. Next, my discussion divides into two sections on divine purpose and goodness reflected in evolution. Next, engaging with evolutionary theodicy, I present a Trinitarian divine action in creation in the context of the eschatological ontology of creation. I believe this study is significant in that it goes beyond metaphysical naturalism, scientific creationism, and the two-language approach by respecting both the integrity of natural sciences and the gospel of God’s self-communication in Christ and the ecclesial community’s Christocentric reasoning in the presence of the …show more content…
I think this view does not befit the Trinitarian nature of the Christian doctrine based on the NT’s cosmic Christology and pnematology. While creation is the context of God’s redeeming of humanity, creation itself should not be excluded from the saving work of God. In that vein, Gunton laments the Western inclination “to subordinate creation to redemption” because it transpires that “the status of the material world as a whole is endangered.” I think the genuine value of creation is to be seen within the Trinitarian history that encompasses creatio originalis, continua, and nova. Thus, the cross of Christ tells us the value of creation. In this light, I discuss from the next section how a Trinitarian theology of nature can help us see the seemingly purposeless and death-ridden history of evolution as God’s purposeful and good creation. To that end, it is important to re-conceive theological method for dialogue between theology and

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