Why Is Perception Important

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Question 2: What is perception and why it is important?
Perception as defined, by Stephen P. Robbins, “Is a process by which individuals organize and interpret their sensory impressions in order to give meaning to their environment” (2005, p.134). Humans habitually interpret what they see, hear, touch, taste, and smell into something that makes logical sense. Each individual sees, hears, touches and smells things differently. Thus, people vary in perception. People see what they want to see; hear what they want to hear; smell what they want to smell; feel what they want to feel; and taste what they want to taste not what is, in fact, therefore human behavior is shaped by their perceptions not on facts. There are also multiple factors that influence one's perceptions.
People perceive things, situations, events and other people in different ways. Superficial issues often dominate their impressions of new people and situations until "more information" impacts their knowledge, understanding and comfort.
Perception can be influenced by the time, appearance,
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They can be both positive and negative. A theory shows some frequently used shortcuts when judging others. The selective perception is when a person selectively interprets what they see on the basis of their interest, background, experience, and attitudes. The halo effect is when one draws a general impression about an individual on the basis of a single characteristic. The contrast effect evaluates a person's characteristics that are affected by comparisons with other people recently encountered who rank higher or lower on the same characteristics. Projection is attributing to one's own characteristics to other people. Then there is stereotyping which is a negative shortcut that involves judging someone on the basis of one's perception of the group to which the person belongs whether it is their gender, cultural background, nationality

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