Ronald Takaki A Different Mirror Analysis

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According to Ronald Takaki in his book A Different Mirror, in 1848’s the discovery of gold in California bought a large Chinese wave, the economy in China was despair. Upon arrival to the U.S, the Chinese work was primarily as miners, laundry, fisherman, and grocery operators. In contrast with the Mexican’s, worked in the farms and in agriculture. The Mexicans faced The Porfiriato of 1976-1911 which stated order and progress or in other words modernization and growth. The Mexican revolution in 1910-1920 made them be push out of their country by the difference in wages and because they were pulled by the factories in the field (southwest). The low wage, poverty, and political events pushed the Chinese and the Mexicans out of their roots, into a high wage and labor demand nation. …show more content…
Violence, poverty, and no employment were the push factors to leave their homeland. As per Takaki, “The supreme law of necessity obliges all these people to emigrate to a foreign land in search of higher wages (294).” Also, because the landholders and speculators had been expropriating small farms and uprooting rural families. Families left mexico to the place known as the dream Norte (El Paso). Other people who had settled in the U.S as workers brought families and friends, the railroad also triggered a mass migration“ And we were told that one could get good money in the U.S and there was work for whoever wanted it (Takaki 294).” Mexicans worked in railroads, cotton field, hotels, as waiters, or asphalt. In a wide range of jobs. American wages are higher than Mexico, most immigrants were from labor (agricultural) young man and woman between the ages of 15-44 years

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