Deforestation: Loss Or Destruction Of Nature

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DEFORESTATION
INTRODUTION
Deforestation are loss or destruction of nature and it is increasing global problem for environmental and economic consequences. Trees are consumers of carbon dioxide helping to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and let out oxygen to let humans consume it. Destruction of trees not only removes carbon sinks but also tree that are burning and pumping more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. There are around 20% of global carbon emissions, deforestation is second only to Energy Supply as the biggest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. With 70% of the Earth’s land animals and plants living in forests, there are many species of flora and fauna are greatly increasing in danger of extinction due
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For that reason, soil erosion ranks as one of the most serious environmental problems in the world. Its effects are pervasive, and its damages are long lasting. Although soil erosion has occurred throughout history, it has intensified as expanding human populations, coupled with their diverse activities, intrude farther into natural ecosystems. Erosion degrades soil quality in natural, agricultural, and forest ecosystems, thereby reducing the productivity of the land. As a result, the diversity of plants, animals, and microbes is diminished. Ultimately, the stability of entire ecosystems is threatened. To offset the damages that erosion inflicts on crops, large quantities of fertilizers and pesticides, plus irrigation, are intensively used. Not only are these inputs fossil-energy dependent, but they also harm human health and pollute the environment. When agricultural land is eroded and can no longer be made productive, it is abandoned. To compensate for the loss, forests are cleared to provide needed agricultural land. Indeed, erosion is the major cause of the deforestation now taking place throughout the world. This article reviews the global dimensions of soil erosion and the impact erosion has on both natural and managed

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