The Mexican American Summary

Good Essays
1. FOR WHAT AUDIENCE WAS THE DOCUMENT WRITTEN?

a.The audience that it was written for were for Chicanos. Chicanos advocated nationalism and sovereignty for Mexican Americans. It was also to show awareness of the mistreatment that Mexican-Americans have had to endure from the “gringo” since being invaded by Europeans. “El Plan Espiritual de Aztlán,” brought a spirit to the Mexican-Americans to show a movement and unit as a race.

2. DOCUMENT INFORMATION (There are many possible ways to answer A-D.)

A. List three things the author said that you think are important:

a.Mexican-Americans wanted to be appreciated by the work they did in the farmers. The article was explaining they are the ones who plant the seeds, water the fields and gather crops. They 're the ones putting in long hours in the field and get no credibility for their hard work. If the Europeans gave them the respect they deserve they wouldn 't be complaining about being mistreated. People shouldn’t be putting long hours of work and get no
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List two things the document tells you about life at the time it was written:

a.One of the thing I noticed by reading the article is that there was work abuse in the farm industry. Mexican-Americans complain that they weren 't treated with respect and Europeans got all the credit for the farming industry. It also didn 't help that their weren 't that many laws that protected the farmers from being taken of advantage. That 's the reason they implemented El Plan espiritual de Aztlan to set foundation for equal rights.

b.El Plan Espiritual de Aztlán was an important historical time in 1969. This gave Mexican-American to live the American dream they always wanted to. If you were Mexican-American you didn 't have the best education, laws to protect them, and economic program for them to run their business. Though they weren 't black they still have equal rights as white which it made it difficult for them to be successful in business

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