Analysis Of The Great Compromise

Superior Essays
Priscilla Etim
HIST 1301
Professor James Adams
July 26, 2017
The Great Compromise: The Ideals and Values of a Growing Nation
The Great Compromise of 1787 is the compromise or the settled agreement of the dispute that erupted due to conflicting views and objectives presented from the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey plan. The purpose of these plans was to create proposed changes to the Articles of Confederation. However, the distribution of representation from the Virginia and New Jersey Plan widely differed. The Virginia Plan was highly represented by the more populous states within the federal government and the New Jersey Plan seemed to provide most of their representation through smaller states who wanted to prevent unbalancing the United
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Traditionally, the depiction of our American forefathers regards them as individuals who were relentless concerned with structuring a solid platform of laws rooted upon coordinated logic and practical ideals. However, Jack Rakove’s theory says otherwise. He retaliates his position through series of elaborated material and reasoning to support his thesis.
In Jack Rakove’s article “‘The Great Compromise’: Drafting the American Constitution” he elaborates on the notion of the well-regarded ‘pragmatic character’ towards the traditional image of our American forefathers. He states “the great challenge of is to balance this image of Convention with persuasive evidence that a concern with principle and theory played a powerful role in the debates of 1787” (20). Rakove’s subtle yet intricate characterization of the American forefathers has opened up several views regarding their image. Ideally, the beginning of this “traditional” American forefather image ultimately rooted from doubtful delegates of Philadelphia Convention. Their
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The emotional and dramatic debates of 1787 initiated an event turning change in the structure of the United States government. The passion of James Madison’s ambition to create an equally powered federal government through the division of government branches have set foot to what the modernized American system is seen today. Rakove elaborates in great detail of the trials and errors which the delegates of the 1787 Convention had to endure. However, without the strenuous debates, contemplating opinions, and theoretical views of the Virginia Plan delegates against the New Jersey Plan delegates, the American nation would fail to stand on the strong values of equal government power. From the various attempts to create an organized federal government power and Constitution, the intentions of the delegates of the 1787 Convention were centered upon the values of theory and philosophy rather than

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