Compare And Contrast The Compromises Of The Constitutional Convention

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During the Constitutional Convention of 1786, one of the most important compromises of the early United States was the Great Compromise. Another compromise that happened at the Constitutional Convention was the Three-Fifths Compromise. These two compromises helped to establish the early government issues of the nation. Together these compromises allowed America to become united. In 1787, the delegates to the Constitutional Convention meant to revise the Articles of Confederation. Instead they began a compromise to form a constitution. James Madison from Virginia proposed a plan that called for a three branch government: legislative, judicial, and executive. This was meant to separate the powers, assuring that not one group or individual could have too much authority. In this plan was also a system that allowed each branch to check the other. This was admitted to protect the interest of the citizen. Much of the debate surrounding the plan concentrated on legislation. The plan proposed that representation should be based …show more content…
The federalist of the Constitution were the people who supported it. The anti-federalist were those who went against it. Federalist thought that the Constitution was based on federalism. The anti-federalist believed that the Constitution took too much power away from the states and did not insured rights for the people. The federalists even wrote essays to answer the anti-federalist attacks to the Constitution. These were known as the Federalist papers. Therefore, Americans asked that the Constitution had a Bill of Rights. Americans thought this would encourage the laws. They believed that it was needed to protect people against the power of the national government. The American Bill of Rights, inspired by Jefferson and drafted by James Madison, was adopted. In 1791, the Constitution’s first ten amendments became the law of the

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