Ratifying The Constitution Persuasive Essay

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After America’s long journey of seeking freedom from governmental oppression, the newly formed nation was skeptical when it came to the discussion of new government authority. Many Americans were still uneasy about consolidated power, while others were aware of the prevalent national instability caused by the lack thereof. Though, in the end, the Constitution prevailed and has become the cornerstone of American government, the path that led to this enduring document was gradual and filled with apprehension and debate. Both sides of the issue had very clear and valid notions about either their support or opposition to the Constitution, and in the end were able to find common ground through patience and compromise. In regards to those in favor of the Constitution, Federalists were those who viewed the …show more content…
The Constitution was the first necessary step in proving that America was capable of managing freedom and democracy. They viewed America as an ever-expanding territory that could only survive given a balanced federal government. As the excerpt from James Madison’s public defense of the Constitution states, many foreign governments at the time refused to engage in treaties with America and did not hold the country in high respect because of the ongoing strife between the government and it’s people. Madison argued that ratifying the Constitution would eliminate much of the disunity between the states and would create trust between the general and individual government. He also emphasized the proposal of a three-fourths consensual agreement policy when ratifying new amendments. Up until this point, there had been rising animosity in America because the majority of the thirteen states could be in favor of an amendment but it would only take one opposing state to nullify the opinions of all the others. Madison claimed that it was unreasonable for a government to rely on the unanimous approval of all states in order to abolish

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