Advantages Of Direct Instructional Model

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As a teacher there are countless possibilities of ways to instruct your students. Depending on what is being taught, as well as the attitudes and abilities of your class, it is up to you to decide which instructional model will work best to unlock your learners potential. One form of instruction is called the direct instructional (DI) model. In this model the teachers and students have a very clear role when it comes to teaching and learning. Teachers are the instructional leaders meaning they structure the lesson and are the “major source of task presentation, and the primary provider of instructional information.” (Metzler, 2011, p. 37). This results in the students’ role being to be receptive, which also according to Metzler (2011) means …show more content…
It would be easy to say that teaching based on the DI model promotes students being passive in the classroom but, in reality, it is the complete opposite. Though the teachers are exerting their full control Morine-Dershimer (as cited in Metzler, 2011) states that “The effectiveness of this [model] is in fact associated with the very active participation of students” (p. 176). Students’ participation and learning is accelerated by the many attempts they are given at practising while in a supervised environment where they will be given immediate feedback. This model is perfect when teaching step-by-step skills as the corrections given by the teacher help eliminate any bad habits that may form because they must experience a high success rate before moving on to the next activity. There is however some negatives to the DI model, one being very obvious to a teacher first beginning to use this form of instruction. This method follows a procedure that must be acted on in order, which can lead to boredom and the stifling of creativity. This can be remedied by a change in thinking because, as teachers, we must realise that this instructional model is a framework from which to build on and make into our …show more content…
As the DI model is structured around following essential steps, there is evidence of the need to advance through the levels. In the initial student practise stage tasks are typically centred on the core skill that must be learnt before progression can be made to the next skill/s. According to Rosenshine teachers must “ensure a student success rate of 80 percent or higher on initial learning tasks” and up to 90 to 100% in later learning of content (p. 174-175). Also seen in behaviourism, advancements can be made once trust has been established. In the first few lessons we need to come across as being stern so that we will be taken seriously however after a few lessons have been completed we can ‘ease off’ because students will by then know what our expectations are. In the behaviourist learning theory progression is evident as “learning of discrete parts is thought to lead to the development of whole ideas” (Baker, 2012, p. 29). Progression is also seen within The New Zealand Curriculum, which “states succinctly what each learning area is about and how learning is structured” (Ministry of Education, 2007). To do so it splits the achievement objectives associated with different ages into levels. Students are expected to sit within these guidelines and with the movement up a year group show the progressions stated. There is a common factor that underpins all three factors, the idea of

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