Lake Okeechobee

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    A nutrient management plan will be implemented for farmland that borders Lake Okeechobee since this lake is the main cause of algal blooms. [9] The following factors will be used to assess nutrient content on land and will be used to determine how much fertilizer can be used. Livestock population: monitoring livestock population can help estimate potential nutrient content Feed management: Animal feed has various nutrients that can pollute soil and water Farming practices: Farming practices can add unwanted nutrient pollution from the use of fertilizer and other chemicals. Animal and water waste handling: Animal waste contains nutrients such as phosphorus and nitrogen, which can pollute surrounding waters. Proper handling of waste can help alleviate nutrient concentration. Soil testing for nutrient concentrations: A variety of soil tests will be used…

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    Lake Okeechobee has become polluted as a result of government approved back pumping that was done by South Florida sugar and vegetable growers to irrigate the fields. The water that was being dumped into the lake contained fertilizers and other pollutants. In 2014 a federal court put an end to this being done. Additionally the lake is polluted by toxic run off from golf courses, and home septic systems which is helping to feed the growth of toxic algae. These algae can kill oysters, as well as…

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    thousands of years before any human settlement; “The Sea of Grass” has a delicate and critical ecosystem with influence on not just flora and fauna but also for humans residing there. Primarily a subtropical wetland, the everglades region is part of a lager watershed with its unique niche containing several plants and animals exclusive to it. With a total area of 4000 square miles prior to human squandering, it’s part of a larger water system consisting of Kissimmee, Lake Okeechobee, Everglades…

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    Davione Lopez Keeping the everglades alive is important. Plenty of animals are in endangered and becoming extinct. Florida everglades is one of the best and biggest swamp to see in north America. The Florida everglades is important because its an endangered environment. The reasons why the everglades and swamps are important is because too much Pythons are taking over the swamps, the animals are getting extinct, and the wetlands help the humans. The snakes in the…

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    Why should we even care about the Florida everglades? I'll tell you why. Even if you don’t realize this, wet lands like the Florida Everglades are so important to both human and animal life. Both rely on the Florida Everglades drastically but lately the Everglades haven't been in there best shape. The Everglades are being badly affected lately by pollution and new animals being brought into the ecosystem. If this doesn’t get under control, Florida could be in trouble. We the humans need to see…

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    Everglades Research Paper

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    The Everglades is a natural park where visitors can see alligators, and take a ride on a hovercraft, located southeast of Florida. It features a variety of fauna and flora in over 6,000 kms long and is approximately one hour from the city of Miami. In recent years it has been affected by the amount of pollutants in the water. A recent study by the University of Florida showed significantly higher levels of pollution in the sediment of the Everglades, an extension of surface water and reed 160 by…

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    Have you ever heard , “Where there is water there is life?” If so, you know what I mean. The Everglades lack fresh water supply. History that the Everglades faced in the past, wasn’t all pretty, causing the Everglades to have problems. People have back -stabbing issues facing recent attempts to improve the fresh water supply. But what happened in the past? To begin with, the Everglades had faced a shortage of water supply when the early settlers arrived. They came to the Everglades and they…

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    Okeechobee City Police Department Investigation Narrative On 11/09/16 at approximately 09:55 Hrs.; I, Officer R. E. Marrero #29 of the Okeechobee City Police Department, was dispatched to 930 SW Park St. [Family Dollar] in reference to a retail theft complaint. Dispatch advised that she received a call from Jazmin Kissey [Manager]at Family Dollar and she advised that there was a couple that stole items from the store and were heading south on 10th Ave. She described the couple as a white male,…

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    Mono Lake Research Paper

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    High in the Sierra Nevada mountains, there is Mono Lake, which is a large but secluded lake tucked away in a depression in the ground a few miles away from the nearest road. At first glance, it may seem like just another normal lake, but it is home to a bizarre, otherworldly landscape that was created when water from fresh water springs underneath the lake mixed with the lake’s salty, alkaline water, forming deposits of limestone. Near the south shore of Mono Lake, grotesque towers of rough,…

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    Loughberry Lake Lab Report

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    This experiment was designed to test what the limiting nutrient was in Loughberry Lake, as well as examine the trophic state of the lake. In order to find out what the limiting nutrient was, we performed a few different tests. We began with a secchi disk test to see the transparency of the water. Then, we took water samples that we later used to test the turbidity levels of the water after adding varying amounts of phosphorous and nitrogen. Phosphorous was the limiting nutrient in the lake,…

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