Freakonomics

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    Freakonomics Summary

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    Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything Steven Levitt & Stephen Dubner Andrew Feist The University of Akron United States Government & Politics 100-638 MWRF 11:00-11:50am Dr. James Holland 07 November 2014 The connection between a teacher and a sumo wrestler probably has not crossed your mind. Have you ever thought about how real-estate agents are similar to members of the Ku Klux Klan? These are not connections you would usually make every day, but they are the basis of the book Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything: co-authored by University of Chicago economist Steven Levitt and New York Times journalist, Stephen Dubner. In the book, they ponder the true explanations…

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    Reflection Of Freakonomics

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    Steven Levitt and Stephan Dubner in their essay “Freakonomics: The Hidden Side of Everything.” (2005) Levitt and Dubner argue that economics is, at root, the study of incentives. They mention the many different types of crime and the rate that it is increasing and decreasing as time goes by. Levitt and Dubners essay points out how often a crime really is happening in different ways that most people would not even realize that it is taking place. I believe that crime is affecting our world…

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    Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything is the result of a partnership between a journalist, Stephen J. Dubner, and a University of Chicago economist, Steven D. Levitt. The two explain that the premise of Freakonomics sprung from an assignment Dubner received from New York Times Magazine to write a profile of Levitt. While interviewing Levitt, Dubner found that unlike other economists whom he had interviewed, he actually understood Levitt’s quirky yet effective way…

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    Freakonomics by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner examines how incentives are the driving force of human behavior. The book makes a connection between incentives and the economy; specifically how these motivations cause a shift in the financial system. The authors of this text are able to support their argument that this connection is feasible through the use of rhetorical questions, juxtaposition, anecdotes, and an inquisitive tone. In order to prove that incentives- “the cornerstone[s]…

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    Week Three Freakonomics Analysis Question The authors of Freakonomics (2006) relate a gang of drug dealers and how their operation works to a tournament or a winner take all market. They imply that a person starts on the bottom of the chain like an athlete or game player would in a sporting tournament, then they work their way to the next level of the game by winning or beating all of the other opponents on that level. The player would eventually work their way through all of the levels until…

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    Galbraith's Freakonomics

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    In chapter 3 of Freakonomics, “Why do drug dealers still live with their moms?,” Levitt and Dubner discuss the idea of conventional wisdom. Galbraith, an economist, believes that “conventional wisdom must be simple, convenient, comfortable, and comforting--though not necessarily true” (Levitt & Dubner, 2009, p. 86). For example, an advocate for the homeless was quoted saying that over 3 million Americans were homeless, which would be 1 of every 100 people. This advocate later admitted that this…

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    Freakonomics has no unifying theme, rather it has multiple themes. Although there is no unifying theme in the book, Levitt and Dubner have a recurring theme which states that “economists love incentives…The typical economist believes that the world has not yet invented a problem that he cannot fix if given a free hand to design the proper incentive scheme.” Freakonomics can described as the power of incentives and how one acts upon them. Similar to the definition of freakonomics, economics is…

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    What Freakonomics is trying to argue that every economic theory is wrong in the sense that it missed that missing link. The authors Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner of Freakonomics wants the reader change their entire perspective on economics. Levitt, the economist of the two authors believes there are root causes to everything certain incentives that pushes humans to act a certain way. The book takes this rule and applies it to teachers cheating, sumo wrestlers fixing matches and crime…

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    Freakonomics is a book about the exploration of prominent issues in society and going against the conventional thinking in regards to these issues. The book declares connections between two topics that are normally not related to each other. For example, comparisons between sumo wrestlers and teachers are made that eventually connect back to economics, in this case incentives. Questions that are usually not asked are examined in the book using evidence; the questions talk about issues seemingly…

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    The book Freakonomics is written by economist Steven D. Levitt and journalist Stephen J. Dubner. It discusses various topics in today’s society that are often over looked. They ask the questions that most people never dare to ask. In chapter one, the authors explain how everyday people find themselves cheating as a way to move up the ladder and benefit financially. This happens more frequently when the incentives they are promised, outweigh their moral compasses. An incentive is defined by…

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