World War 2 Working Women Essay

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Women were limited. A woman 's primary role was considered in the home. This was eminently believed, but World War II changed that. Working women were uncommon and were a threat for white males who worked in the same industry as they did. World War I was an opportunity for women to have “their foot inside the door and demonstrate [their abilities to get the job done]” (Dubois and Dumenil 516). That lasted for some time, and many returned to their societal views of a woman’s role as a housewife. In contrast, they proved that females are as capable as men to lead the economy of the country, and capable of handling a “man’s job” wholly. World War II brought extravagant opportunities. An excessive amount of women enrolled in jobs, as well joined the military. World War II did not instantly diminish the macho mind of a woman’s place in home or of work; however, the war effort expanded females participation in the work force, military, …show more content…
Women proved that one does need to be masculine to perform heavy duty jobs like welding. Women did not want their femininity to be undermined, because they worked at jobs that was overpopulated by men (Dubois and Dumenil 2016, 526). Rosie the Riveter represented the whole abstract of feminism,and a hard worker, and that she could be both (Dubois and Dumenil 2016, 526). The war brought independence. All women, married or single, who worked in war jobs or industries had a taste of it. Beatrice Morales, a married Mexican American, claimed because of working she felt like she could do what she wanted because it was her money that she deservedly earned (Dubois and Dumenil 2016, 529). African American women proved to industries that they too are just as hard of worker as white women. Japanese American women brought the power of unity in the internment camps, and a great amount went on to college. Women planted a seed for future generations to come and prove to the world they are just as

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