Women's Role In Ww2

Good Essays
Throughout history, the male has been the most dominant figure living on planet Earth. Difficult tasks and jobs have been given to men, and women were given simpler, less demanding jobs. Women often were thought of as weak and fragile so they could not do the tasks of men; who were pictured as muscular and intelligent. Women were not given equal rights to men but in World War I and World War II, the government and society ran into a problem, and women were able to prove themselves as strong, unique, and skilled. As soldiers went to fight for their nations in World War I and II, women were left with the responsibility of replacing men in factories and on farms, which resulted in them becoming huge contributors and obtaining more independence. …show more content…
The Women in War Jobs campaign, featuring Rosie the Riveter, is considered the most successful in American history. The campaign attracted over two million women using advertisements on the radio, in newspapers, movies, and songs. Magazines featured their articles on different versions of Rosie the Riveter to persuade women to work during the war (Clauss 9). One version by Norman Rockwell depicts Rosie as a muscular woman with a riveter and a lunch box, illustrating the complete opposite of prewar femininity (Hoyt 2). Women started to work because they felt that they were helping to contribute to their loved ones on the warfront. This drive to enlist millions of women in the workforce resulted in it being very successful because propaganda influenced women to aid in the war efforts on the home front. Millions of women joined the workforce during both World Wars because of popular advertisements and messages. Rosie the Riveter in the Women in War Jobs campaign targeted several groups of women. The campaign was directed towards women in the workplace (offering to upgrade them to factory jobs with higher pay), high school girls, and married women with children whose husbands were fighting on the warfront (Hoyt 3). Most of the women involved in any job was not working for money, they felt that they were helping to support the war because they were making weaponry and other products for men to use in war instead of doing housework at home. All of the effort made into persuading women was driven by a main message. The idea of the Women in War Jobs campaign was advertised to all women across America to help convince women to join the workforce. The main goal and message of Rosie the Riveter was to acknowledge the importance of patriotism and the idea that war would end sooner if women at home filled the shoes of men fighting on the warfront (Hoyt

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Women's Role In World War I

    • 2371 Words
    • 10 Pages

    Many people believed that World War 1 helped women but this is false. “ World War I led to several important advances for women. Women’s war work increased support for woman suffrage and contributed to the passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920. In addition, during the war, the Department of Labor created the Women in Industry Service. After the war, the Women in Industry Service became the Women’s Bureau, headed by Mary van Kleeck.” During World War 1 women dominated the workforce and did a really good job with the tasks that they were assigned.…

    • 2371 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women After Ww2

    • 1207 Words
    • 5 Pages

    As a result, “to keep the country going and to support the war effort, and American women were asked to help” (Coster). Furthermore, women was so willing to sacrifice themselves to support all the needs for the war because by the span of the war six million or more women are labor workers. The government made a surprising yet successful strategy to include women in the war effort. The decision paid off because it benefited many American and allied…

    • 1207 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Rosie The Riveter Essay

    • 2015 Words
    • 9 Pages

    Who can do it? Women can! The millions of women working for the war effort led America to victory against the Axis Powers. Rosie the Riveter, as their mascot, symbolized women 's efforts and started a movement for women 's rights across the country. "Rosie the Riveter" was a character created to inspire American women to stand up and join the workforce.…

    • 2015 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In conclusion to World War II, the role of the women were the most significant of the era because without the help of women the men would’ve fell short to the enemy because they couldn’t do it by themselves. This total war with women showed the men that women should be able to work some jobs that men work because they are capable to fulfill the job. After World War II the women were not looked at the same because they were the hero’s behind the…

    • 716 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    World War One helped the role of women to change from mothers to munition workers. These women saw many opportunities in the workforce as the men left for war. Many women worked in munition factories that helped prepare weaponry for the war. Several women worked long shifts in bad conditions, which they were never used to. However, they were determined to work because they were finally able to do work to prove themselves to be as capable as men.…

    • 1307 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    “These forward thinkers risked being abandoned by their families and ridiculed by neighbors. Some even were hit with rotten fruit when they appeared in public. They struggled on, however, believing that women should be free to explore all of their creative and intellectual interests and abilities.” This use of pathos also shows that there was a true transformation in these women’s lives; they were ridiculed and abandoned, but they still held their heads high in their fight for women’s freedom. The final way they use pathos is when talking about women working in factories. “By 1860, almost 300,000 women worked in textile mills, shoe and clothing factories, and printing plants.…

    • 1000 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women's Roles During Ww2

    • 1453 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The government used manipulative campaign poster to recruit women and influence society’s views of women’s importance in the war. The poster’s images idealized women suggesting that their femininity would still be intact regardless of if they were in the military, offices, or shipyards. They wanted to persuade women and men that working would not reduce a woman’s attractiveness and would now have a wave confidence engulfing them. Of all the images of working women during World War II, “Rosie the Riveter”, dressed in overalls and a head tie along with the slogan “we can do it”, was the most symbolic of womanhood. Rosie was a representation of the strength and patriotism of women.…

    • 1453 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women After Ww2 Essay

    • 1137 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Today women are lawyers, doctors, surgeons, judges, and in the army. During World War II when men were in combat, they needed women to work in factories. Women had the chance to work, make money for themselves and control their money which usually men control the money. After World War II the work field changed forever, women are now working and today women are pursuing their dream careers. Due to World War II, the lives of women changed in three ways: being able to work in the army and be pilots, women standing up for themselves the get the same privileges as men, and women working from the homefront, feeling confident, and like they have a voice.…

    • 1137 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    More than 59,000 nurses served during World War II, at home and overseas (Coster, “Women in World War II”). Nurses assisted overseas, in combat zones, and at home. Nurses received rankings of second lieutenant, first lieutenant, Captain, Major or Commander, each rank increasing the women’s pay grade. Unlike other professions women adopted during the war, nursing was one that was relatively safe, in terms of job security. Men did not want to be nurses, they would more likely become doctors, nursing was a job dominated by women, and considered feminine.…

    • 1305 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    More than one hundred thousand women served in the women's Army Corps later became known as the Women's Army Corps, and also joined the United States Navy. The women in the wars effort was proven to be victorious and they left an everlasting mark on American society. World War II women faced the greatest challenges of trying to gain recognition and serve their country in more ways than they had in previous years. Women became comfortable with the roles as they changed in World War…

    • 580 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays