Rosie The Riveter Ad Analysis

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The United States entered World War II on December 7, 1941 after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. After this women began to take a role in helpping the war effort after men enlisted in the military and rushed off to war. Many women started to loose their homemaker image and work outside the home. By 1945 one out of every four married women worked outside of the home. These women changed everyday women 's roles by working in industry, military, and the community around them. World War II changed the image of women 's roles in many areas; a major part of that change was seen with women taking over male-dominated jobs. Before the start of the World Wars a female 's job was to be a wife, mother, and homemaker. After men started …show more content…
entered World War II, war posters, government issued signs, became posted everywhere from small towns to large cities. These advertisements showed that women could be soldiers and feminine so in many ads they wore uniforms. These signs appealed to the women 's sense of patriotism. One of the most famous and popular icons was Rosie the Riveter. The "We Can Do It!" poster by J. Howard Miller was rediscovered in the 1980s and made into a cultural icon for feminism during the 1940s. Rosie the Riveter was a very popular term and it was "coined" in by a song of the same name by Redd Evans and Jacob John Leob. Also the term "Rosies" became popular not only for women who worked with rivets, but any woman whose work helped the war effort. Rosie the Riveter presented the idea that everyday women strived for: someone who was involved and good at her job, but also remained feminine. Advertisements, war posters, and other propaganda convinced women that "women for the war effort was" …show more content…
The Army Nurse Corps started in 1901 and the Navy Nurse Corps began in 1908. Both groups rushed to Pearl Harbor to help after the attack and started with a combined number of 8,000 nurses. These women served in theaters all over the world even in combat zones which were exhausting and challenging living conditions. Many nurses also had to endure without ample supplies and had tropical illnesses and diseases. These women served under fire in Field Hospitals, Evacuation Hospitals, on Hospital trains and ships, and as Flight Nurses on medical transport aircraft. Nurses in the Army and Navy Corps had uniforms and received statuses such as Officer, Major, Lieutenant, and Colonel. Over 90% of all nurses in 1942 held rank of Second Lieutenant. By the end of the war the Army Nurse Corps had 59,000 members and the Navy Nurse Corps had 11,000 members. The Red Cross supported the U.S. in World War II by providing additional medical help. Over 40,000 employees directed the efforts of 7.5 million people. More than 200,000 women volunteered in the Red Cross Volunteer Nurse 's Aide Corps in which they pledged to serve 150 hours annually to perform non-technical nursing services at military and civilian hospitals. On the home front Red Cross nurses provided critical health care services to American civilians during the war. The Red Cross also certified over 71,000 women who later served in the Army and Navy Nurse

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