Women In Early America

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In early America, women were seen in traditional roles such as tending to the house and the needs of the family that included cooking, cleaning, preparing the spouses and children for their day, gardening etc. Family was women's most important affiliation during the 1800s. The middle class women continued their traditional work but it was not considered real work, more of a duty as they did not earn any money from it. However, this notion changed as we entered the 1900s.

WWI began in 1914 and the US entered the war in 1917. During WWI, since most men enlisted to fight in the war, industries were left without workers. These industries focused their efforts labor force of women. Nearly 3 million women workers were employed at that time. The traditional outlook that women were not suited for outdoor jobs was broken down. Not only did women perform their household duties but they also worked in the industries supporting the war. Factories that had produced arms and munitions saw women working to fill those positions. Women learned many new skills. They were becoming independent in the knowledge that they could handle both household duties and still be able to support their families and in turn support the country.

After WWI, some women returned to their place in
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It was the name given to the women on many of the propaganda posters, representing the American women who worked in factories during World War II, many of who produced munitions and war supplies. These women essentially replaced the male workers who were in the military. These 'Rosies' were seen as strong, serious and competent women, who were able to work the heavy jobs that were only reserved for men before. The 'Rosie the Riveter' image symbolized the vital importance of women workers. Many women began working outside the home for the first time. Media propaganda urged American women to get a job that would help America to win the

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